What's in a name?

I'm suffering from a severe case of solid-water-itis.  Doc says it will not clear till spring, I understand it is going around.  For many of us, paddling has stopped and building has slowed, thought it might be fun to share stories of how we came up with the names for our mistresses...

 

My first boat, a Muskoka Seaflea (yes, the dreaded spread-boat) I named “Kidd”.  I was thirteen at the time and my older brother referred to as me “the kid”, I added the extra “d” since my initials are “DD”

 

Fast forward 30 years: My next and current project, a 17’ skin on frame Kayak, I named “Kia Ora”.  I wanted something that would reflect my New Zealand heritage and one day before construction even started, I was helping my wife with the dishes.  I was drying and looked at the tea towel.  It was from New Zealand and had the traditional Haka, a Maori war dance that the All Blacks do before each game.  There in the translation was “T’is life” – Kia Ora

 

My Wife’s boat, a Chesapeake 18 will be “Aquarius”, because she is… and it is a water sign.

 

Please respond with your stories of how you came up with the name of your boat.

Test paddle?


66 replies:

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RE: What's in a name?

I love stories like this.  Naming a boat is a grave responsibility.  You ponder and ponder and then one day it just comes to you.  About two years ago my wonderful wife decided to come out of retirement and go to work as a flight attendant for United Airlines.  My big challenge was to figure out how to spend so much time without my best friend.  She, in a moment of fantastic inspiration said: "why don't you build a boat"?  Six months later I launched my MC 16.5 proudly named "FRIENDLY SKIES". Now as I get started on my Shearwater Hybrid I am again faced with the big challenge.

i look forward to more stories.

Paul G.

RE: What's in a name?

After returning from Alaska and seeing whales I finished my first yak an Expedition Single which ended up being 6 inches longer than it was suppose to be.  At 19' 6" it is a whale of a boat, Hence my Whale

My second yak is a Guillemot L which I hope to ride for a long time on the seas  Watch my blog to see my "Seahorse" getting built

http://kayakkev.wordpress.com/

RE: What's in a name?

David...

 

My Dad was a marine surveyor here in Ontario and he had a great love for wooden boats that he passed on to my brother and I. Here's our first boat, "Chicken of the Sea". She was homebuilt in the late 40's in Florida for use in the Gulf of Mexico. She was about 22' long and had a single inboard WWII surplus Willys Jeep engine. It was pretty much junk when Dad found it - it had maple trees growing in the bilge from the dry-rot. He and Mom brought her back to life and she was the jewel of Lake St. Clair. During her re-launch in 1968, she had not swelled enough in the hoist slings before she was set loose. She partially sank. Upon re re-floating she was christened "Chicken of the Sea". We enjoyed restoring several other classics over the years. That's me on the fore deck without the captain's hat (but with the toothpick legs!). I'm wearing my Apollo 11 shirt in July 1969.  I now paddle my kayaks near where this pic was taken.  I learned to fish, swim as well as how to properly throw-up over the side.  I still suffer from sea sickness.

RE: What's in a name?

Twenty-plus years ago, I started to make a list of things I wanted to do during my lifetime (way before The Bucket List).  Number nine was to build a boat, and number ten was to learn to sail. Here is my Jimmy Skiff, Life Goal #9...

Jimmy Skiff

Ron

RE: What's in a name?

Great stories all:

 

I have a Wood Duck 12 that my father in law was gracious enough to build for me.  I have always loved wooden boats, and was very intimidated by the whole construction process.  It was a truly rewarding experience watch flat sheets of plywood turn into a work of art.

I named her "Gratitude" in part for the thanks I have for his hard work and dedication towards the project, but also the thanks for life's little things that we sometimes take for granted - family, health, environment, good friends, etc.  I could go on and on but viewing the world from a kayak quickly puts things in perspective.

Dan Kehlenbach

Anchorage, AK 

RE: What's in a name?

Donaldson's nominated for this year's Academy Award for "Post Most Inspiring of Inspiring Posts". Thx, DD.

My best friend at college, who hung out with me and me girlfriend (and future Boatwife), said that his Brooklyn Jewish Mother called her a "shiksa".  And me a "goy".  The mom didn't approve of either of us, felt the friendship would distract him from becoming "a Doctah!" (it didn't) but we were flattered to learn what our ethnic identity was after years of thinking we had none, and we loved these Yiddish words, ethnic slur or no.

So, my c. 1973 Sunflower sailboat was named "Shiksa". We sailed it in the Bay (Intracoastal WW) when we "went down' the Shore" as Philadelphians call Avalon, Stone Harbor, etc.

On a beam reach, Shiksa could zoom along at zero knots Speed-Over-Ground when the tide was running, and even more when it was not.  My other Shiksa gave me 5 wonderful kids and a few years ago bought me a CLC boat kit as a Christmas present. Pretty good, eh?  Every once in a while I get out the manual and ring up John H. to ask him how to undo the last mistake, but I don't know that the eponymous Sharpie will ever swim.  But the kit is fun, and it has now given me a chance to use the word "eponymous", so life is good.

 

RE: What's in a name?

Donaldson's nominated for this year's Academy Award for "Post Most Inspiring of Inspiring Posts". Thx, DD.

My best friend at college, who hung out with me and me girlfriend (and future Boatwife), said that his Brooklyn Jewish Mother called her a "shiksa".  And me a "goy".  The mom didn't approve of either of us, felt the friendship would distract him from becoming "a Doctah!" (it didn't) but we were flattered to learn what our ethnic identity was after years of thinking we had none, and we loved these Yiddish words, ethnic slur or no.

So, my c. 1973 Sunflower sailboat was named "Shiksa". We sailed it in the Bay (Intracoastal WW) when we "went down' the Shore" as Philadelphians call Avalon, Stone Harbor, etc.

On a beam reach, Shiksa could zoom along at zero knots Speed-Over-Ground when the tide was running, and even more when it was not.  My other Shiksa gave me 5 wonderful kids and a few years ago bought me a CLC boat kit as a Christmas present. Pretty good, eh?  Every once in a while I get out the manual and ring up John H. to ask him how to undo the last mistake, but I don't know that the eponymous Sharpie will ever swim.  But the kit is fun, and it has now given me a chance to use the word "eponymous", so life is good.

 

RE: What's in a name?

My father, who is Japanese-American, had a bright yellow fiberglass sailboat of about 25 feet back in the 1970s, can't remember the model now, but it became affectionately know as the "Yellow Peril". Around 1980 he aquired a Pearson 35 (which he still has) that had been named by the previous owner "Desiderata". When he built a stitch-and-glue sailing dinghy in the early 1980s for use with Desiderata, we decided the dinghy should be known as "Errata" really that should be "Erata" to be recursively erroneous. Still has the dinghy too.

My Chesapeake 17LT I have taken to calling the "Enso Maru" for the rice paper zen circles on the hull. A rather small "maru" really:) My shearwater hybrid, I'm not sure yet, was thinking maybe "Sinister Maru" for the asymmetric stripe down the left-hand side of the deck.

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Ogata (eric)

RE: What's in a name?

"Anahareo"

After Canadian Ojibway woman and author (AKA Gertrude Bernard). Arguably the first modern environmentalist.

You might remember the story of turn-of-the-century author "Grey Owl" (real name Archie Bellaney) who ran away from England as a young man, pretended (OK I'm simplifying here) to be a Canadian Indigene ("Indian"), and wrote a bucn of books about beavers.

Well, Anahareo was his wife. She turned him from being a trapper of beavers into an advocate for their survival. She convinced him to stop trapping and set up one of the world's first animal sanctuaries. They may well have saved beavers from extinction.

An unsung heroine, largely forgotten.

for me, the significance of the name is in the idea that she is the woman that turned a larrikin (A lovable rogue) into someone who left the world better than he found it. Set him on the path of righteousness, as it were...

Plus, she's gorgeous: http://www.pastforward.ca/perspectives/images/Anahario_dawn.jpg

.

RE: What's in a name?

I named my kayak Mahutonga, which is the NZ Maori word for the Southern Cross constellation.  I have been to New Zealand several times and it is definitely my wildest dream to be able to immigrate there.  

I incorporated the Maori koru symbol into the deck of Mahutonga.  The boat is a Redfish Spring Run Kenai

 

 

RE: What's in a name?

These stories are great!  Ogata, hilarious!!  Typical American humor, which always hits my funnybone, cause I R one, too.  Some of my kin were dang "Welsh fer-inners", I think.  But the rest?...as my daddy said when asked where we came from, he said "If you trace our family back far enough, it just disappears into misty hills of West Virginia..."

RE: What's in a name?

My wife and I retired two years ago and built our first and only boat to date, the CLC Skerry, last summer at IYRS in Newport under John Harris's expert tutelage. She's 90% complete and we too are eagerly awaiting spring to complete varnishing the interior and spars, and launch her for the first time.  By choice, we never had children but we raised border collies for many years and had three wonderful border collies ourselves over a period of 17 years.  We put our last one down last May and it was one of the saddest days of my life.  Megan was seventeen and she was my first dog.  I still cry over her ashes in our family room.  However the other two border collies, Montana and Jiggs were also wonderful dogs and Montana especially was an unusually handsome one.  He wea a beautiful tri-color (black, brown and white) as gentle as a breeze.  We had to dedicate our lovingly built Skerry to our beloved border collies yet we couldn't favor any one over the other for a name for our her.  So we did the next best thing.  There are three common commands for a border collie when working them on herding sheep, which is what they were originally bred for in the Scottish highlands.  "Come by" means circle left, "Way to me!" means circle right, and "That'll Do!"  means job well done; hold and rest!  What better name for a devotees of their beloved dogs than to name our newly built Skerry, "That'll Do."  In addition we onlaid a rice paper print of our Handsome One, Montana at the rear seat,  God, we miss those dogs.  Best,  Bob H.

RE: What's in a name?

P.S.  If someone would instruct me on how to post a picture to the forum, I'd love to share a few pics of our "That'll Do".....best, Bob H

RE: What's in a name?

Attention you CLC folks.  I hope someone is planning on collecting all these stories.  These are much to good to lose.

Paul

RE: What's in a name?

That's lovely story, Bob H - almost brought a tear to the eye.   We enjoyed sharing our life with more than one Shetland Sheepdog (aka 'Shelties') at one time, and still yearn for another occasionally.  But I do have to wonder at this desire to name our small craft - bigger yachts, etc., I can understand, but a sea-kayak?   I'd feel embarrassed...!   It's bit like people who have to give a name to their house - "Dunroamin', 'Thistledo', and so on.   Aaaarrrggghhhhh!   However - chacun a son gout, as they say!

Lol from Oz

RE: What's in a name?

After dirving ships around for a lot of yeas I tend to agree with Lol about putting a name on a kayak. I did see a great name on a little runabout in Chicago one time. On the transon was the name Karen. that was x'ed out and the name Jane was x'ed out and the name Mery was x'ed out and the name Beth was x'ed out and on and on and on. Now that guy knew how to use his boat! SEEYA Jack

RE: What's in a name?

That's pretty funny Jack  :)

As for the naming of kayaks, or any small craft, personally, I take it about as seriously as the naming of cats. Oh wait, I guess that's pretty seriously! :) And I have never bothered to put a name *on* any boat (or cat). The spirit and name of a wooden boat is something to contemplate during the design, construction and many hours of recreational sanding along the way.

And though it may be constructed from scraps of driftwood, sinew, skin and bone, or plywood, epoxy and fiberglass a proper kayak is a fully seaworthy vessel. (Or it had better be!) It is the result of some thousand(s of) year's refinement by people who trusted their lives, and the lives of their families to these ingenious craft. Such a small boat, powered by a single person, capable of safely navigating a very large ocean, whether as a matter of pure survival, or as a matter of play, earns my full respect, regardless of its size. Or perhaps especially *because* of its size.

As for the two small cats recently installed at my home (Happy Bottoms), so far, I'm thinking perhaps, "John Paul Jones" and "Enterprise" (I'm fully expecting "Enterprise" to eventually weigh more than some cedar strip canoes!:)

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Ogata (eric)

RE: What's in a name?

BOY!!!  Twice in one night I must agree with the same person.  I must be sic.  Although I don't carry the eloquence of words that Ogata does, I must say that I name my yaks for several reasons, although I dont paint the names on them.  The first reason I do is the fact that I grow a bond to my yaks when I am out in deep water knowing that my life is dependent on it working for me to get back. 

 Second, on the yaks I make/making I pour a lot of myself in building it from design, to craftmanship.  It becomes a little part of me. 

 And third, when you own your own fleet (6 yaks and growing), you have to be able to seperate them when a buddy comes over and says which yak are you taking today?

Hey Eric, I think the two new arrivals need a big brother.  I have a tuxedo that weighs in at 13 lbs., 1 1/2 years old and will ship for free.

RE: What's in a name?

Wow Kev, at 13 lbs he is approaching the weight of the mythical "nymph" canoe built from 3/16 inch strips! It's a very generous offer. But how's this for a counter-proposal? Free shipping of John Paul Jones and Enterprise to live with their big brother, plus 10 dollars instant-cash. Which has to be at least 5 times their actual retail value!

You've assembled a formidable kayak armada there. It must be an impressive sight should you get them all paddling in formation. And another one on the way?

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Ogata (eric)

RE: What's in a name?

Gee Eric, what a tempting offer, but I am afraid the dog would pack her bags and leave if another cat comes in this house.  Mans best friend and all....

I have one half built, forms for 2 more after that, and am looking at plans for another.  Hahahaha, I'm obsessed, although my wife says I am anal.  Besides, my yak trailer holds 8 and it seems a shame not to fill it.

Kev

RE: What's in a name?

Announcing that Kev's "Got to fill the 8-yak trailer" is a 2009 Academy Award candidate in the "Best Excuse for Ordering another Yak" category.

RE: What's in a name?

Holy Cats, Kayak-Kev! If I'm counting correctly, this sounds like you're on your way to 9? So I think the trailer should be named, "Eight of Nine". Then when you get to 10, you can X out the "Nine" and write in "Ten", etc....

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Ogata (eric)

RE: What's in a name?

Having been slightly – but I hope respectfully – scornful of Those Who Would Name Their Craft made me recall the comments of my mate who introduced me to this pastime.   Like stout Cortez, he studied the Pacific here on our doorstep, and the vast expanse of Bay we paddle on, separated from the ocean only by a few sand islands, saying “when I’m out there it feels like I’m sitting on a toothpick”.   I could instantly visualise where he was coming from – toothpick and sea-kayak alike are wooden objects vastly longer than their width or circumference, with very sharp pointy ends.   From the air, a paddler would certainly look like he was on a toothpick! So I may informally refer to my craft as ‘the toothpick’, but that’s about as far as it will go! Cheers to all… Lol from Oz

RE: What's in a name?

I have two Kayaks,  Mine is named Susie Q for the song and the time I met my wife who by some peculiar hapenstance happens to be named Susie.  Hers is wave dancer.  She is never happier than when dancing, rock, folk, modern, tribal belly dance or in the kayak. 

Now if we could just develop the skills to realy dance over those waves instead of paddle through them.  

 Maybe I need to build a petral or a shearwater (currently a Chessie light 16 and 17)

I think I can fit 3 or 4 on top of the van.

 

RE: What's in a name?

Sorry this took so long folks, but I just learned how to upload a photo here and I wanted to show y'all my Skerry with her name, despite that some of yy'alls think it's silly.  Now go back and read my origina post!  best,  bob h

http://picasaweb.google.com/WagPondBob/NewportRISkerryBuild?authkey=LSOrIa9fRvo#

RE: What's in a name?

I've four boats. 

The first is a sharpie similar to a John's Sharpie, but built to a modified Reuel Parker design, and modeled on the sharpies used on the Chesapeake over a centruy ago.  Bay watermen generally name their boats after significant women in their lives, using either the "Miss [nickname]" or "[given name, last initial]" format, so I named mine after my daughter; it proudly carries "Catherine C" on its transom. 

Sea kayaks remind me of shore birds, scooting along the beach dancing in and out of the surf, so I asked my daughter what her favorite shorebird was.  As a result, the Chesapeake 14 I built for her is the "Dunlin."  My favorite shorebird, on the other hand, is a sanderling, so that's the name of my LT17.  The fourth boat is a Folbot Cooper, but as I didn't build it, it languishes under a rather pedestrian moniker -- simply "the Cooper" or sometimes "the Folder." 

If I ever build a bigger boat, big enough to cruise for some time and maybe even go offshore, it will be the "Ojo de Agua" or "eye of the water," named after my parents' favorite fountain in San Jose, Costa Rica, near which they lived back in the late '40s.  I've long thought that would be a perfect name for a sail boat.

 

RE: What's in a name?

 As a signpainter who has painted a lot of names on boats on the upper Chesapeake I have seen some really strange ones, but they all paid the same.

 Someone mentioned the importance of giving a cat the proper name. We have a cat named Hobie Cat. Hobie sounded better than naming it after our Beetle Cat! 

RE: What's in a name?

None of my kayaks have names (other than Shearwater, Pachena and Tampico) and that's the way it will stay.  My first stitch and glue boat was a Bolger Cartopper that I built on the deck of my condo 16 years ago.  My girlfriend at the time was a lovely young Portugese immigrant named Rose who kept me supplied with mixed epoxy as I put the boat together.  So that boat became "Rosebud."

RE: What's in a name?

LOL, Rosebud is the name of my airplane (she came with it ;)

Rosebud

RE: What's in a name?

This may get a little long, but since this topic won't die, the time has come to tell it.  Back in the late 70"s my friend Russ and I were helping a college name his converted Bristol Bay sail boat.  We recommended a name for which he could get a sign at the hardware store:  "Keep of The Grass", "Beware of Dog" etc.  He finally settled on a sign he saw on the side of a local grocery store:  "Smoked Fish".  Well the idea stuck and a year or so later Russ and I decided to enter the 2nd annual Cross Sound Rowing race from West Seattle to Bainbridge Island.  We decided to stay in the double rowboat class and not compete with the sliding seat crowd.  The idea was to maximize performance thru design and build dirt cheap.  We also knew it would be a last-minute deal and that of course influenced the name.  We "layed the keel" 7 days before the race.  Hanging over the building site was the sign fresh from the hardware store:  "WET PAINT"  We launched WET PAINT two days before the race and took a second place on the 5+ mile course across the sound and up into Eagle Harbor.  We followed this with two consecutive wins in the Cross Sound in the next two years, one in  WET PAINT and one in WET PAINT 2., plus the Wet Paint Racing Team enjoyed many other races around Puget Sound, including Ballard to Bainbridge, Round Shaw, The Lutafisk Pull, and Pull N Be Damned.  Both boats are gone now, WET PAINT we sold to some unsuspecting fool at a yard sale and Russ gave WET PAINT 2 a Viking Funneral whan the A/C plywood (remember cheap) began comming apart.  He did however send me a section of the bow with the name painted on it and WET PAINT 2 now hangs in my boat shop.

RE: What's in a name?

"Time Well Spent" works both in and out of the water.

Phil

RE: What's in a name?

No named Kayaks, but I have recently inherited a new name for myself.

 I have two young nephews (4 and 6) that rather enjoy coming up with new nicknames for various family members... a few examples - Grandpa is "Grandpa Tractor Ride" - Uncle Bob is "Uncle Boat ride" - and being in a CLC forum it probably goes without saying, I have offically and forever become "Uncle Boat Builder"

RE: What's in a name?

I built a Mill Creek 16.5 double two years ago to take my kids out in. I ordered a set of plans and took 2 weeks off in January... during which I spent most of my time in the garage. I was a little bit in the dog house with my wife after so many hours cutting, gluing and sanding and by the time I was ready to take it out for a spin on the river she was quite fed up with the whole boating thing. The kids loved it and wanted to go at every opportunity, but it continued to get on my wife's nerves.

 [IMG]http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj223/jayarbro/DT_small.jpg[/IMG]

It only seemed natural to name it "Double Trouble".

 

  

RE: What's in a name?

My nearly finished Chesapeake 16 will be called "Odysseus" - appropriate as my name is Penelope

RE: What's in a name?

I named my first kayak "The Endurance" I just hope it doesn't end up with the same fate as the original.

Phil

RE: What's in a name?

I hadn't thought of naming my Wood Duck, but I had talked about building a boat for so long my wife thought "Journey" fit. I agree.

Don

RE: What's in a name?

This should be better.

Don

 

 

 

 

 

 

RE: What's in a name?

I, Like JimC, named mine after my daughter.  LKP are her initials, so I came up with that, so I wouldn't have her name plastered everywhere so people could ask about it (yes, I'm paranoid).  It also happens to be the first letters of "Leaky Kayak Project" which is what my working name for the boat was as I was building.  (Tunred out to be a very apt name since she started taking on more and more water over the last couple of years).

It's not written on the boat anywhere, and I have other names for the boat as well, so it's more a term of endearment than an actual name.

FrankP

RE: What's in a name?

 

Suggested names are welcome for the new CLC dory, which will be out on May 1st.  "CLC Dory" just isn't going to cut it.  I keep waiting for a flash of inspiration on the name, but it hasn't come, which is exactly how my sharpie ended up being called..."John's Sharpie."  (As in, "Will someone please get John's sharpie out of the way?  It's taking up too much space.")
I had settled on "Jupiter Dory" for no reason other than I liked the ring of it, but that hasn't made it into print yet. 

RE: What's in a name?

John,

It seems like a dory should have a name that ties it to its cod-fishing heratige.  I'm thinking about those old guysworking hand lines, dressed in fowl weather gear - How about "Sou'wester"?

Paul

RE: What's in a name?

John, I was thinking along the same lines. You see these boat all over Newfoundland, Labrador, Prince Edwards Islands and Maine. Since they're so good at getting you home in a blow, how about "Nor’easter" SEEYA Jack

RE: What's in a name?

Following along in the same general path as Paul and Jack; I am going to suggest the Cabot Dory as sort of a tribute to explorer John Cabot (Giovanni Caboto) - I'm sure I am a bit rusty on my history, but it seems that John's name was synonymous with Newfoundland and it's early days of Cod Fishing.

RE: What's in a name?

John,

Perhaps Jupiter's nautical brother Neptune might be more fitting along those lines. Probably been done though:)

 Some silly play on the word "dory". Totally unprofessional!

  • dorado dory
  • so-la-ti dory (do-re)
  • explora dory
  • pisca dory
  • munky dory (to go with the shop monkey/gorilla theme)

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Ogata (eric)

RE: What's in a name?

Eric - please keep taking the medication.

Yours...

Worried Wordsmith

RE: What's in a name?

Wordsmith,

I'm feeling so much better now. Um "Edit"

pisca dory? pesca dory. Hell I can't spell in English, and you gets what you pays for!

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Ogata (eric)

RE: What's in a name?

I am Just now finishing my first boat that I've ever owned, a Chesepeake 17. When I started this project I fully expected to have a near perfect example of this fine looking model. I rubbed green, blue and orange stain in large sweeping patterns into the deck. I created fine pen and ink drawings of killer whales and serpents, and a big eye at the stern made from smaller seahorse like creatures and whales for the pupil, onto rice paper and placed beneath the fiberglass. In my minds eye It was going to be perfect. Right. It has all those things, along with places sanded to far into the veneer, cracks at the stern filled with sawdust thickened epoxy, a bow with at least three dips in it. Somehow, I managed to get the deck beam an inch too close to the bulkhead or visa versa, and now its exposed an inch into the cockpit! I am sure that I used at least 50% more epoxy than was necessary inside the hull of the boat. Now I have put on my first coat of varnish. I now know how difficult it will be to get that finish to my "expectations".

   Looking at it now I would not change a thing about it. I will affectionately paint the name "Snaggle Tooth" on the side when its finally finished.

Steve.

 

RE: What's in a name?

I am building a passagemeker this spring, while I am on sabbatical, so it is only logical to name the boat "seabatical."

RE: What's in a name?

Well done, Steve, now we just need some pictures.

 

PlateTec, fantastic choice for a name.  I may have seen it before on a sailboat, but that doesn't make it any less inspired.

FrankP

RE: What's in a name?

John:  Dory Names.....Dory Glory?  Glory Dory?   Hunky Dory?  Storied Dory, Dory Lorry?  Lorry Dory?  Soary Dory?  Torre-o' Dory?  For-A-Dory?  Floor A Dory?

Or any variation thereof!  Best,  Bob H

RE: What's in a name?

 

  • Amore' Dory - Special deal when purchased with Peace Canoe!
  • Hello Dory! - No mouth. Little red bow. May weigh more than some cedar-strip canoes.

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Ogata (eric) - Stop me, before I post again!

RE: What's in a name?

Mora Dory Um? 

Flora Dory?

 Herrow Dory? 

 Dory Dory Hallelujah?

 Mine Eyes Have Seen the Dory?

  Derry-Dory? 

 Re Dalia Dory?  

 Nae O'Brig-A-Dory?

Signa Dory?

In Flama Dory

Humi-Dory

Humid-I-Dory

Revolutionary Tory Dory

H-E-E-E-L-L-L-L PPP!!!!!!!!!!!!    bob h

RE: What's in a name?

John,

 I like keeping with the Chesapeake inspired names:

Tilghman Island Dory, Kent Island Dory, Cambridge Dory, Blue Heron Dory...however I did discard Assawoman Bay Dory.

RE: What's in a name?

 

So far, "Nor'Easter" or "Northeaster" is my favorite.  I like "Sou'wester," too, but the notoriously litigious Hinckley would object.

I hear you on using Chesapeake Bay place-names, and we'll do that when it makes sense.  But our new dory is emphatically of New England blood, very traditional, and it seems strange to impose a Chesapeake name on a Massachusetts boat.

 

 

RE: What's in a name?

Massachusetts huh?  Well, Hyannis Dory is out.  What about one of the coastal tribes' names?  Nauset Dory, Niantic dory, ...

RE: What's in a name?

Uh oh, adult supervision!

  • Down Easter
  • Gloucester
  • Cape Cod
  • Grand Banks

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Ogata (eric)

RE: What's in a name?

  • Mystic

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Ogata (eric)

RE: What's in a name?

John, Certainly not because my suggestion is leading the pack at this time, BUT, I suggest a set of plans go to the contributer of the new dory's name. Keep thinking Nor' Easter... SEEYA Jack

RE: What's in a name? - Dory name

Hown about the "Molly Kool Dory" in honour of the first licensed North American female ship captain who passed away last week at the age of 93  in Maine.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/nova-scotia/story/2009/02/27/kool-seacaptain.html?ref=rss

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/03/world/americas/03kool.html?partner=rss&emc=rss

Chris

RE: What's in a name?

Enough already!

 

Wordsmith

RE: What's in a name?

 John, a couple more serious entries this time....

Bay Colony

Plymouth

Plymouth Landing

Plymouth Rocker

Cod Coaster

Cod Hooker

Cod Seeker

Bob H.

 

 

RE: What's in a name?

Before Wordsmith discounts my entry, I submit some supporting documents to strengthen my serious proposal to name the new CLC addition the "Molly Kool" Dory.  As North America's first female sea captain and only the second worldwide, Molly Kool commanded her father's homebuilt vessel the Jean K pictured below - imagine sanding that project!.  The link provides some more details about her life at sea.  Molly's life and adventures blurred our borders - born to a Dutch sea captain and his wife and raised in Canada; sailing the Maritimes and the northeast coast of the U.S.; settling down and recently passing in Bangor, Maine. 

Looking for some support from all those lady builders out there!

Chris

http://www.virtualmuseum.ca/pm.php?id=story_line&lg=English&fl=&ex=00000084&sl=1933&pos=1

Molly Kool & Jean K

RE: What's in a name?

NY Times posted her obituary last week. They had the lifejacket story slightly different:

'Ms. Kool was nothing if not pragmatic. On one widely reported occasion, the Jean K collided with another ship in a dense fog and sent her hurtling overboard, where she risked being sucked under by the ship’s propeller. A piece of timber floated by and she grabbed it, as the ship’s passengers hurled life preservers down at her. “I’m already floating,” Ms. Kool hollered up at them. “Stop throwing useless stuff at me and send a boat!”'

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/03/world/americas/03kool.html?scp=1&sq=molly kool&st=cse

--

Ogata (eric)

RE: What's in a name?

I can't help myself !   

Cod Buster

 

bob h.

RE: What's in a name?

I can understand the problem with "Sou'wester" -- the resemblence to the Hinckley is just too strong. 

So go with Nor'easter."  A good and approrpiate name, and those of us who want a Chesapeake-related name can think you're referring the the little port town at the top of the Bay.    ;-)

RE: What's in a name?

Yeah.  Don't recall a lot of dories there, though.  Mostly, the best sub sandwiches in the world at a little dive called Stewart's in "downtown" Northeast.  And slathering a lot of anti-fouling paint, at McDaniels' Marina in off-season.  Oh, and the softshell crab sandwiches at sunset at the old NERYC, after a long weekend on the water...and stealing great slabs of phosphorus for our youthful ordnance experiments from old barrels sitting outside the sparkler factory near the yacht club, and canoe-camping on Turkey Point and the on the blackberry-lined banks of the Susquehanna, or was it the Sassafras...

I digress. This thread is supposed to be about boat names.

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