Two Sailrig Questions

 

 

To date Ive used small ratchet nylon straps to fasten my akas to my deck. I want to be a little more traditional though and go with the rope lashings. What is that nifty knot however that is used and is the rope attached to the aka or the eye bolt?

Lastly, Ive got rope and fastners to raise and lower my rudder. Ive chanced it in the past that I wouldnt hit a rock, shoal or sandbar  but sooner or later its inevitable. So I have a line for lifting and pulling down the rudder but my question is simply - Is there such a thing as a cleat or somesuch that will keep tentsion on the rope holding down the rudder  but release like a clutch if I hit a rock?  A fixed cleat could be ripped right off the deck.

 

Thanks in advance guys!!!

 

Pete


8 replies:

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RE: Two Sailrig Questions

re: the rudder question, would a section of bungee in the line that lowers the rudder work?  give you enough tension to hold it down and enough give to allow it to bounce over obsticles? 

RE: Two Sailrig Questions

I put some lead(actually a little too much) in the lower part of the blade to keep it down and I figure every now and then I'm going to re-coat the leading edge.  A line is rigged for when we come to shore to pull the blade up out of the water so it doesn't dig in and put too much stress on the rudder fittings.  Worked like a charm on the oyster bars in Cedar Key and the leading edge isn't very scratched up.  If it deteriorates I'll make another and used about half the lead that I did this time.

RE: Two Sailrig Questions

Thanks guys,

 

How did you put lead in the rudder? Molten pour or lead shot?

 

Thanks in advance.

 

Pete

RE: Two Sailrig Questions

Auto-release Clamcleat. You set the release tension point with a screwdriver. Manufacturer's webpage is here.  CLC doesn't carry this yet, but I bet if enough people asked they would.

Laszlo

 

 

 

RE: Two Sailrig Questions

Pete

   Did a moulten pour of wheel weights in a galvinized bucket on my campstove in the backyard while I wore a respirator during the pour.

RE: Two Sailrig Questions

Guys,

Thanks very much. Very much appreciated. The lead pour--- you mean a camp stove can actually melt lead?  I thought you needed something more concentrated and furnace like. How long to lyquify?

 

Pete

RE: Two Sailrig Questions

Plain ole Coleman propane stove.  Lead has a pretty low melting point so it doesn't need a lot of heat, certainly no furnace is needed.  I put the bucket with the wheel weights on the stove, fired it up, and just kept walking by every few minutes to check on it.  Didn't time it, but it couldn't have been more than 20 minutes start to finish. Definitely  suit up for the pour. I had face sheild, respirator, welding jacket and gloves, heavy jeans, and work boots. This is no time for flip-flops and shorts.

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