Repairing damage to my Peeler Skifff

To my fellow boatbuilders,

I recently damaged the forward segment of my Peeler Skiff while trailering it at low speed.  I cut a corner too close and punched in an approximately 6" x 2 foot segment on a low concrete/metal post.  The damage is just above the bottom but does not involve the bottom.  I have been trailering boats since I was a teenager but it only takes one distracted moment. . . 

I assume the proper repair is to cut out the involved segment, fashion a replacement Okoume segment, epoxy it into place and the fiberglass over the repair, inside and out.  Fortunately my damage does not extend into the watertight/flotation segments of the boat which will make things a little simpler.  My main question is will it prove difficult to match the replacement segment to the curvature of the hull and are there any tricks or techniques in this regard?

I would be grateful for insight from anyone who has found themselves in a similar situation and is will to admit it and share the benefit of your experience.

Thank you.

Kendall Jones

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the damage is low but above the bottom and does not involve the bottom.  Been trailering boats since I was a teenager but it only takes one distracted moment. . .

I assume the proper repair is to cut out the involved segment, replace it with a segment of Okoume, expoxy it into place and the fiberglass over the repair both inside and out.  My question is whether it is difficult and are there any tricks to matching the curve of  the hull?

I would appreciate any thoughts for my fellow Forum members if you are unfortunate enough to have experience with a similar situation


5 replies:

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RE: Repairing damage to my Peeler Skifff

i haven't done what you described to a peeler skiff, but did punch a similar hole in stitch and glue kayak when i paddled over a piece of exposed rebar where they had used scrap concrete (with rebar) to stabilize a section of shore line.

so the quick answer is....not a problem....you can fix it.  if there is a challenge its only about the cosmetics.  if the boat is painted (and my kayak was), other than gaining a couple ounces....nobody other than me knows it was repaired.

steps 1 is going to be to remove or expose the damaged segment so that you can deal with any problems in the okoume and then the glass that is cracked.  this does not necessarily mean you need more okoume....if its cracked, for example, you can expose the crack by removing the fibreglass and then fill the crack with epoxy slightly thickened.....   if you have to replacy the okoume section....not a problem....you can cut it out and create temporary forms on the adjacent hull to bend the new piece around.   

step 2 is then doing the glass repair which is fairly standard.  any repair will also require a bit of fairing and this is easy and, if you are going to paint over it, a non issue.  for fairing, i use microballoons that is very easy to sand....and allows you to fill any minor hollows that might get created when you replace or fix the underlying okoume.   

anyway, there are a couple good examples with a little searching on repairs on the website....they all use pretty much the same techniques and principle....which is expose and address the problem in the core material (the okoume) and then re-do/repair the glass (which was removed to expose the problem in the core).

h

RE: Repairing damage to my Peeler Skifff

   here are the links:

https://www.clcboats.com/shoptips/epoxy_and_fiberglass/surviving-catastrophe.html

 

 

RE: Repairing damage to my Peeler Skifff

Good general repair discusstion here:

https://www.westsystem.com/wp-content/uploads/Wooden-Boat-Restoration-and-Repair.pdf

...see section 5, I think, for your particular issue.

Trick will be to figure out the best way to get pressure on the patch to conform to the curvature, without distorting the existing shape, once you get the hole trimmed up and beveled and a patch shaped to fit.  Might need to screw through with blocks of some sort inside and out, holes to be filled afterword.  It's one of them things where you need to puzzle on it for a while until the lightbulb comes on.

.....Michael

RE: Repairing damage to my Peeler Skifff

 

I had some post trouble last year. Despite my Skerry being the highest boat up the beach it still got spun by a wave and driven onto a post in the sand (there for a beach umbrella). 

 The side panels are 6mm plywood so it was a fairly simple task to cut the hole bigger to get a good edge then cut a wide  'rebate'.

I then made 2 3mm patches, one to fit the hole and one to fit the 'rebate, glued them together and epoxied them in with a few copper wire stitches around some dowel to spread the load. After that it was fill the edges with thickened epoxy, fibreglass, fill coats and paint. She's now back on her mooring for the summer.

RE: Repairing damage to my Peeler Skifff

Yambo,

Very nicely done. This is why we should all hang on to the wood scraps and leftovers after the boat is finished.

Laszlo

 

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