Scarfing tools for a Sassafras 12

Hi forum, A question on the alternative tools for scarfing. Which is easier & better? ( I need to make a 2mm deep, 3/8 wide scarf on 4mm ply)

1. A No 78 stanley rabbet plane which I have access to or 

2. A 1/2 in mill end bit for a hand router, I don't have a table for the router. or

3. A rabbeting bit for the router where the bearing will run on the thin 2mm ply edge?

Thanks forum, Chris

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8 replies:

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RE: Scarfing tools for a Sassafras 12

i  like rabbet planes.  if you got one, with a sharp blade, shoud make quick work of it.

do a little practice on a scrap piece.  also very easy to make a little gate for it to ensure a straight line.

RE: Scarfing tools for a Sassafras 12

What Howard said. Planes are quieter, easier to keep sharp (which makes all the difference), easier to control and safer.

Laszlo

 

RE: Scarfing tools for a Sassafras 12

West Marine sells this monstrosity:

RE: Scarfing tools for a Sassafras 12

   Chris

Are you cutting Scarfs on the ends of the planks or making the rabbet joint on the edge of the plank?  If you are cutting scarfs then I would use a hand plane, if you are cutting rabbet joints on the edge of your planks I would setup the router table to make the rabbit joints. 

See link:

https://www.clcboats.com/default/lapstitch-construction.html

 

RE: Scarfing tools for a Sassafras 12

In addition to the hand plane, I've also had some luck with a power hand planer and a random orbital sander to really sweeten up the straight lines of the plywood layers and get a paper thin edge that is solid hardwood surface layer for making pretty scarfs for bright finishes.

RE: Scarfing tools for a Sassafras 12

   Hi Forum, re using a router rabbeting bit. To do a 3/8 wide 2mm deep rabbet on the edge of 4mm ply. The gap on my rabbet bit between the top of the blade & the bearing is 2mm thus with a 2mm deep rabbet there is nothing left for the bearing to run onto. In the instructions they use a router for the Sassafras 12, but how? Are there different bits? Thanks forum, Chris 

RE: Scarfing tools for a Sassafras 12

 Lacking a CNC mill w/vacuum hold-down table, Chris there’re two ways I’d approach this.

With a router you can use a simple straight bit if you first add a stop-fence to the base. This is sized & secured so that its inward edge serves as your material guide, and the bit - if wide enough - can be run in a plunge cut relief area cut into the fence to clear chips. With patience this works on straight or convex curves, not so effective on concave unless you can shape the fence to a slightly tighter radius.

Second way would be to use a reverse-patterning bit (router on top of cutter) to profile a scab piece secured to the bottom of your work piece with double-sided tape. This provides a better bearing surface for a standard trace bit (bearing on bottom) as well as helping to hold that 4mm stuff flat along the edge. Only drawback is whether carpet tape might pull fibers off workpiece when your operation’s completed.

RE: Scarfing tools for a Sassafras 12

 Lacking a CNC mill w/vacuum hold-down table, Chris there’re two ways I’d approach this.

With a router you can use a simple straight bit if you first add a stop-fence to the base. This is sized & secured so that its inward edge serves as your material guide, and the bit - if wide enough - can be run in a plunge cut relief area cut into the fence to clear chips. With patience this works on straight or convex curves, not so effective on concave unless you can shape the fence to a slightly tighter radius.

Second way would be to use a reverse-patterning bit (router on top of cutter) to profile a scab piece secured to the bottom of your work piece with double-sided tape. This provides a better bearing surface for a standard trace bit (bearing on bottom) as well as helping to hold that 4mm stuff flat along the edge. Only drawback is whether carpet tape might pull fibers off workpiece when your operation’s completed.

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