Northeast Dory Blog!

Hi all!  I am just beginning my Northeast Dory.  So far, I have the bulkheads, skeg, transom, and hull panels assembled, ready for the lonesome hours of sanding to come in preparation for stitching. 


If you want to follow my build blog, heres the link: 

nedory.blogspot.com

Thanks!

 

 

 


42 replies:

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RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

Well, I just started my build as well and may get to the hull panels on Friday so a few days behind.  Well be intersting to compare notes.  Good luck!

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   Dam spell check....

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   Oceanluvr, your previous posts were what motivated me to build the northeaster* dory instead of the skerry!  Best of luck on your build and please send me updates and pictures on how your build is going. Do you have a build blog going?

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

Building blog!  I am lucky i can type LOL.  In all honesty I don't think i can find the time to write a blog, but I am going to take photos throughout the build and will post them as some point. 

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   Not sure how to leave a comment on your blog and it's probably too late but I understand that some folks use the bulkhead doublers as templates for the foam flotation blocks that go under the seats. Enjoy your build.

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   Catboater, thank's for your comment. The doublers template has already been transferred to some spare cardboard. Any more tips would be greatly appreciated

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   Hi Giggin, I've also started my Northeaster, just a little behind you. Question: How much sanding before you start the stitching? Are you looking to have clean panels and no epoxy stain anywhere? Or is it a case of just removing the lumps and bumps? Why you ask? I've just finished the glue up of the bottom puzzle joint, there are places where a couple of the 'tongues' are a little proud on one side. I've sanded some but am of the view that the fibreglass and epoxy to be done on the bottom will offer an opportunity to get it all to a smooth surface later. If its going to be detectable later, best i get on and do more sanding! Thoughts?

 

 

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

Don't worry about epoxy staining. If you try to sand the stains out, you run the risk of sanding right through the first layer of veneer. On my boat I did try to sand the lumps and bumps to provide a flat surface for the fiberglass cloth.   

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   Thanks for that Birch2. Am very conscious about too much sanding, however I  thickened the epoxy with cell-o-fill on the number 1 panel puzzle joints and I'm worried that this will show through the varnish finish I have planned for the interior....you know I've just answered my own question. I was going to say the concern was'nt so much for the bottom puzzle joint because that will be under a layer of f/glass cloth...then i realise so will panel 1!!!! Duh! OK, next issue I have tried to find reference too in all the forum exchanges, is about unthickened epoxy to go over a puzzle joint AFTER it has had its initial glue up and has cured and I find that one or two of the fingers is a little 'proud' ...off ....perfectly flat. Too much sanding a no no.. so what about a thin layer of unthickened to take out the dip/bump and then feather the sanding to the ply either side? The outsides of the panels I'm ok with because i intend to paint, its more critical for the inside faces...am i thinking logically...or just being too anal?

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   I had a couple of puzzle joints that were uneven enough that I was concerned about oversanding. So I made up some fairing epoxy that I thickened so it was softer than a fillet mix, with the wood flour and squeegeed it into the low fingers, then sanded.  Granted, I was planning a painted finish from the start, but it still looked pretty good under the final epoxy coatings before I painted.

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   I had only one puzzle joint that was uneven enough to be of concern. I sanded through the top layer of veneer (more or less accidentally), but I'm not bothered in the least by the outcome. Wood has lots of variations in color and this is just one of them.

The good news is that this has absolutely no effect on the boat's ability to sail fast!

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   Thanks Sawdust and Birch2, much appreciated. Love this forum on CLC's platform! Does'nt matter where we are and the time zone differences between us benefits my working hours. At the end of the day I post my questions and when I start the next day I have answers..how good is that? Our winter just starting but very mild in comparison to what you have experienced in North USA this year.

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

  Gerry51, keep us updated on your build!

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

 

Certainly will. I hope to be finished by September which is the start of our summer..    

Under the Southern Cross I Stand
A sprig of wattle in my hand,
 

 

 

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

Giggin --

I've been following your blog on your dory build -- it's looking great!  I'm at the sanding/ varnishing stage of my dory and have linked to my pictures before -- but thought I would share the link again.  I also have some hints on the spacered inwales -- my method differs somewhat from what John C. describes in his method.  (Search on inwales in the forum -- my method is brilliantly titled 'My Method').  I'll be posting more pictures this weekend -- but here's the link:

https://goo.gl/photos/kvLCqExcr1UNvWMh9

Cheers,

Dave M.  

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   Dave, your Dory (not to mention your pulley system) is looking absolutely fantastic! Wow.  I'll be sure to read about "Your method", I gave Johns a read on lunch break about a week back it threw me for a loop!  

I'm thinking about staining my Dory's inwales (along with all the spacers) and rubrails...  I want to create some contrast against the Okoume interior, which will be varnished.  However, I have already put the breasthook on so I won't be able to stain that.  Will the difference in color between the breasthook and the inwale be too funky? What do you think?  

Lovely shop by the way, I hope to one day have my own! 

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   I did want a contrast with the inwales which is why I went with the white oak. (Plus, I had some white oak left over from another project.) I like contrast in the wood -- plus the finished edge of the plywood looks like inlayed stringing. So -- I would go with the contrast. I'm also using some curly maple in the thwarts and in the oarlock riser blocks. That's looking pretty sharp! 

Above all -- it's your boat. I'm viewing mine as floating furniture and have been having fun with that.

Dave M.

 

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   Dave, 

Are you a furniture maker -or- only a hobbyist?  Either way, a true craftsman.  I also like how you brought the outwales to a point without rounding at the bow (they're quite rounded on the plan if I remember right), I may have to take some inspiration from that!  I was going to mention the finished edge of the plywood adding quite a bit of character, I am definitely going to make sure I get that edge nice and flush now.  

I'm looking forward to seeing it varnished.  Enjoy the sanding ;)!

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   One more thing before I throw in the towel for the night, somebody may be able to talk some sense into me.  

I'm *thinking* I would like the look of using countersunk screws on the outwales and plugging with matching -or- contrasting wood bungs.  I'm having a bit of trouble picturing the final product in my head and don't want to get the port side done and realize I've made a big mistake.  

Does anyone have input on this?

 

 

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

Personally, I think contrasting plugs would be a bit much.  Plugged screws are needed to attach the outer wales to the breasthook at the bow, since there is not a convienent way to clamp the wales.  I used matching plugs from the excess material.  Keep in mind that the outwale will be banged up a bit at the dock (yes it will happen).  One modification I've seen is epoxying a rope around the outer wale to serve as more protection.  (I did that with my bow and skeg.)  

Dave M.  

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   Years ago I owned a 32' wooden yawl built in 1960 and the teak rub-rail was plugged with the same wood and looked good.  I personally think contrasting plugs may be a bit too much.   You can also route out a cove and epoxy rope into the groove or alternately use half oval brass.  Below is a mock-up of how the rope is to be attached.  Of course you first need to route out a cove for the rope to ride in.

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   I have been following your blog with keen interst as I am, as pervioulsy mentioned buildking a NED as well.  I read that your adventure with the fiberglass was a bit challenging and like you I am looking at starting that phase with a bit of trepidation.  I was wondering why one could not cut the fiberglas mat as soon as panels #1 were wired as opposed to waiting till all the panels were wire to the assemblies?  Seems to me it would be a lot easier to measure and cut and furthermore to get a really clean edge where the glass ends on panel #1.  And would that not eliminate the need to tape and trim where panel 1 meets panel 2?  Am I missing something? 

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

oceanluvr, As soon as you cut fiberglass cloth, the edge starts fraying.  If you try to precut the cloth, by the time you get it coated with epoxy it will be a mess.  Mask the edges where you are going to glass, then cut the cloth so that it overhangs the masking tape by at least several inches.  When you coat with epoxy, coat over the masking tape a bit.  Wait a couple of hours until the FG partially cured (green), then cut the edge along the masking tape with a sharp razor.  It is much easier than you would thing.  FG is nothing to fear, If you have not already, watch some of the CLC videos regarding FG.  Here are some picts from my last strip build.  The third pict is after cutting the cloth with the razor and before any sanding.   

I start my NE Dory as soon as I am done with a strip kayak for my wife.  Probably July.

   

   

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   What a lovely kayak you're building, Mark! Congrats on your success.

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

Quick question for fellow builders, at what point do I epoxy coat the interior of the hull?  I'm doing the spacered inwales and assuming I need to coat the hull before installing the inwales, or else it'll be nearly impossible to coat between the blocks!

-Derek    

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

 You can go ahead and epoxy the interior of the boat, as epoxy will stick to epoxy. With my way of installing the inwales, I also epoxied the ends of the blocks after installing them, and epoxied the inner (glue surface) of the inwale before putting it in place. You want a thin coat here so you get a nice joint between the block and the inwale.  

In answer to your previous questions -- I am an amateur furniture maker. I've made a set of dining room chairs (arts and crafts), a desk for my wife, and some other things, but nothing for profit, other than my mental health. Building the boat, and especially sailing the boat, will serve the same purpose!

Dave M.

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   One for Flactem aka Dave M; love your series of picture for how you did your spacered inwale so some of the techniques I'm keen to try on mine. A couple of questions if I may?  1.  On a lug rig I have to incorporate the mast partner as well as the rowing blocks into the spacing calculations and choice of sizing. How big are your spaces and the inwale blocks; 2. Where and how are you going to place the rowing blocks for your oarlocks?   That'll do for now, there will undoubtably be more to follow. Very useful and very generous effort to share on your 'method' . Thanks. Gerry 

 

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

1.  Loving the thread and the build blog!

2.  I found out long after I'd made my outwales from QSWO for my EP that allegedly, oak works poorly with epoxy.  I had only one little hiccup, which was at the bow where it makes the largest bend, so I didn't blame the oak.

3.  Dave aka Flactem, can you shoot me a link to any furniture you've made?  I make Stickley/Limbert stuff for my family.

 

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   Flactem, I'm in the same boat as Gerry!  What were your spacing calculations for the inwales?  John's write up is for the Skerry and I don't have the excess materials to try out all different spacings. 

Very cool work CaptainSkully, I especially dig that bathroom vanity. 

-D

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

Ahh. The spacer block calculations.

What I did is put together some spacing blocks so that I could find the right alignment on the boat itself.  (This was after I spent some time with a calculator trying to calculate the spacing. Frustration ensued.) I wanted blocks above the bulkheads, and blocks below each end of the oar lock risers.  After playing around for a while I finally decided that I could use different size spaces and it would not be noticible.  My blocks are all 2" long, but the spaces between them are either 2, 2 1/8, 2 1/4, or 2 3/8 inches long.   You can also cheat where the oarlock risers will be. I was right -- unless you really study the inwales, you can't tell that the spacing between them varies.  (Adjacent spaces only vary by 1/8 inch.) 

Accomodating the lug mast thwart will be interesting since the inwales are at an angle.  (I'm looking at the figure on page 155 in the construction manual.)  You might need to angle the bottom of the thwart on each side to accomodate the inwale angle -- or get creative with the inwales themselves.  I'll have to think about that one.

Captain -- nice looking furniture! I don't have a web album yet for my furniture -- but I'll post a link when I put one together.  I also read about the epoxy/oak problem, but had no difficulties with my white oak.

Dave M.

 

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   The knees for the mast thwart (in my kit) have come with an angled champher which accords with the diagram on p.155, to give the thwart an horizontal surface to secure too. I'm therefore thinking that the only option might be to split the inwale into two ; fwd and aft of the partner thwart knee. John C did warn there might need to be a bit of head scratching for the NED Lug! Giggin, looks like we might need the calculator when we start this bit. I've had to ask my kit supplier about quarter knees for the inwale of the NED, because if they are needed to finish the inwale aft at the transom then he needs to supply them. (Unless Dave M made his own!) So here is the thought: Inwale needs to be made in 4 sections, 2 fwd. of partner; 2 aft. of partner. If you fashion an extention for each side of the partner knee that gives a distance from the partner knee aft and fwd that is equal divisible by say 2" (ie 2" equal space and block) then all we have to do is calculate and manufacture 4 little ole extentions to the partner knee.  Could'nt be that hard with a table saw and bevel guage!!!! Now I have an excuse to get that table saw, else this boat is going to turn into a right cluster..! Gerry51 on a roll!

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

Yes -- I did use my own wood for the inwales, quarter knees, and breasthook.  (All in white oak.)  Going for that contrast.  And here's a riser block,  out of curly maple with the brass fittings and vanish.  It's coming along!

Dave M.

 

 

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   Dave, that is some impressvie riser block, nice job!

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   Thanks Dave M, nice riser block! Given you made your own breasthook and quarter knees then maybe I'm going to have to fabricate my quarter knees too.

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   Hey everyone, how many coats of epoxy will be put on the hull interior?  I'm finishing the interior epoxy coatings & installing the seats prior to starting the gunwales

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   Hopefully not too many!  A better part of the last 3 hours was spent encapsulating!  I found it a bit tough getting epoxy into the end grain where the laps are.  Mostly because I was using a foam brush for that, and the foam brushes just want to collapse when moving around the thick epoxy. I tried out using a chip brush, it's much more efficient, however it leaves bristles around everywhere!  Any tips for the future? Besides corners and crevices, epoxy was rolled with a 4" roller and tipped with a 3" foam brush.  The hull looks very pretty

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

With yoru chip brush you can start by vacumming the end to get rid of all the loose bristles.  Then where the bristle meets the metal just above the wooden handle run a bead of a CA glue on both side to bond the bristles into the handle.  This technique does a good job of eliminating the majority of loose bristles finding their way on to your work.  After you've bonded the bristles, cut them short- maybe an inch or so long - this makes the brush stiffer and works good on edges.

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

Looking forward to your build blog, I am myself a Northeast Dory lover. Keep on Posting.

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   Oceanluvr, thanks for the tip!  I was planning on sanding AND epoxying today after work, but the sanding took about two hours (5:30-7:30) and 8 sanding discs, so it was a little too late to start rolling epoxy on, as it took my around three hours yesterday.  Tomorrow! 

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

   Hey fellow NE Dory builders.  Some of you may know this already, but I just wanted to give you a heads up if you do not; the manual states that three coats of epoxy on the interior of the boat need to applied.  I have been coating the interior, waiting for it to cure, sanding, then recoating over the past 5-6 days.  You DO NOT have to do this.  I was researching today and you can apply all three coats in one day. Once the epoxy starts to gel and can support the weight of the next coat, you're good to go!  Sadly, this could have saved me about weeks worth of time (and lots of sanding) :/

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

  That's deifnitely good to know.  I just flipped my boat today and wil now apply epoxy to the bottom as a tack weld.  How about if one is going to paint the insides/ousides, is 3 coats still recommended.  I recall reading something about that somewhere but cannot locate the article or blog.

RE: Northeast Dory Blog!

You want at least three coats of epoxy -- and perhaps four if you have done much sanding between coats. The epoxy is the protection on your boat that is supposed to last forever. The paint or varnish is mostly sacrificial -- there to protect the epoxy and to make the boat look pretty.   

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