Paddling at Night

I wrote some old posts about intstalling relfective decklines, not only for better visibility at night but to better facilitate rescues whether grouped, paired or solo. You need more than that beautiful varnished deck to hold on to.

As for paddling at night generally, lots of related graphics including pointers on how to make  securite calls on VHF ch. 16 a night., not too much text.

Includes what boat light patterns mean, including the dreaded simultaneous green and red patter that indicates you're in danger of getting run down.

It's all at paddlingtravelers.blogspot.com

includes nearly a dozen VHF-radio related posts that have embedded audio files that let you listen in on VHF calls recorded by the Coast Guard.
 


4 replies:

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RE: Paddling at Night

"Includes what boat light patterns mean, including the dreaded simultaneous green and red patter that indicates you're in danger of getting run down."

Or that you've scared him off :-)

Laszlo

 

RE: Paddling at Night

"Includes what boat light patterns mean, including the dreaded simultaneous green and red patter that indicates you're in danger of getting run down."

Or that you've scared him off :-)

Laszlo

You would need to see a white light on the stern for that. 

 

RE: Paddling at Night

SHHHH! you're messing up the joke :-)

Besides, the white light could be burned out, or covered by the prize swordfish hanging from the mast, or ...

Seriously, though, you're absolutely right. The other thing about the simultaneous red/green pattern is that it needs to be showing a constant bearing for an actual collision to occur. But even with a changing bearing there's the bow wave to worry about. All that's the main reason why my night paddling is confined to moonlit nights on creeks that are too shallow for propellor-driven vessels. And, if worst comes to worst, I can just wade to shore.

 Laszlo

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