drilling holes question

I'm about to start drilling holes for deck rigging etc, the manual for my wood duck says to use clear silicone caulk when I screw into the hole for waterproofing purposes.  The tips on this website say "drill, fill, drill" using epoxy for the holes.  Are these interchangeable methods?  Is one better than the other?  Any clarification would be much appreciated.

Hunter 


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RE: drilling holes question

http://www.clcboats.com/shop/products/boat-building-supplies-epoxy-fiberglass-plywood/3m-marine-grade-clear-silicone-sealant.html

Hunter, this is the product recommended on the website for filling screw holes... not seen an epoxy solution as you mentioned.

Hope this helps,

Larry

RE: drilling holes question

You need to protect the wood of your boat from water infitration. The "drill, fill,drill" is a way to seal the wood and is the first step you take when fitting out.

By drilling a hole slightly larger and filling it with epoxy, you have "sealed" the wood. You then drill a hole the size you need in the center of the filled hole.

The silicone caulk keeps the interior dry.

RE: drilling holes question

So are you saying you have to do both (drill, fill, drill and use the caulk)?

RE: drilling holes question

also, when filling the holes with epoxy, do they have to have wood flour mixed in the epoxy because I am out, can you use silica?  If you have to use wood flour where can you buy that stuff in a hurry, Lowe's, Home Depot?

RE: drilling holes question

If you have a dust collector on your electric sander you can provide your own wood flour. It is the fine wood dust created while sanding.

RE: drilling holes question

I use the silica in my mix. You want it strong. The epoxy treatment is for the protection of the wood not as a leak stopper. so it may seem a bit of overkill to use both but you don't want to have your"baby" rot from the inside out.

RE: drilling holes question

I may be causing you a little stress. I'm building a Pocketship that has several thru hull holes and fitting that require the "drill,fill,drill" routine.  If you are using wood screws the caulk may be all you need. The trick is to keep water away from the wood.

RE: drilling holes question

cool thanks, when I attempt to screw my seat straps in they just won't go with a screwdriver, a drill with a bit won't fit due to the floor of the boat, and the wood just appears to be pulling up with the threads, any advice all you pros,

Hunter 

RE: drilling holes question

I'm not familiar with the particulars of the wood duck. But I know on CH17 and Shearwater, a right-angle drill was necessary to drill the holes up under the coaming that hold up the backband. That might solve the problem you mention about the drill not fitting due to the floor. Of course, you should use a tapered bit to create pilot holes for the screws. If you have overtightened and stripped out the pilot hole, perhaps you could fill it with epoxy/wood flour and drill it out again? Or go with a slightly larger screw?

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Ogata, eric

RE: drilling holes question

I have used an awl to make a dent, followed by using a countersink bit *by hand* to pre-drill the hole for the screws that hold the backband straps on the wood duck. (The countersink provides a surface large enough to grip with your fingers so you can turn the bit.) Worked great!

 Julie K.

RE: drilling holes question

I am so tempted to go with a remark like, "You used a countersink bit?! By hand!!! Why, when I was a little boy, we had to chomp the holes out with our bare teeth! And we liked it! We liked it just fine!!!"

But I guess it's been done. So I'll just note that Julie K. is one tough woman!

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Ogata, eric

RE: drilling holes question

Ogata, eric said

"But I guess it's been done. So I'll just note that Julie K. is one tough woman!"

-------------

well.... nobody who knows me would dispute my toughness <g>.... but really, in this case driving a countersink bit (the style that has an itty bitty bit sticking out of it) by hand isn't hard, especially since the shaft on the screw in question isn't very long (and no, you don't have to go so deep as to actually countersink the thing.  The countersink portion just makes it possible to get a grip.... at least for a "little bit."

 Julie K.

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