Compound curves in decking

Chese 17, when I strap my deck pieces down tight, there's a noticable dip at each end where the curve transitions..., it almost looks like a hump in front of a hollow.  Is this normal?  Will it even out when I begin nailing the deck down?

I also noticed that it's very difficult to get the narrow bow and stern areas to bend over and match the curve (albeit slight) of the sheer clamps..., I think this is related to the issue described above.

And yes, bending the forward deck over the beams was a bear!  Now I understand the "tortured plywood" expression.

Appreciate any thoughts.

Larry


10 replies:

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RE: Compound curves in decking

I put some challenging curves into the deck of my Shearwater 16. A few things I can suggest/learned. First but probably too late for you now, 3mm oakume is easier to bend. You can add deck beams and stringers under your deck to keep the the dip and subsequent hump out of the deck. Adds a little weight but not as much as you might think[weigh some scraps and you will see]. In compound bending, you will be torchering the plywood and putting alot of load onto the substructure. Mine broke. If I did it again, I would form curved T or I beams and pay more attention to the joints. It takes 3 people, straps and a little cursing to do it right. 

Lew

RE: Compound curves in decking

That little "hump" will pop out as you install the deck.  You SHOULD have a helper to hold the radius as the deck is fastened down, however.

RE: Compound curves in decking

John, thanks.  Will have a helper, and I've done a couple dry runs with several straps (probably use 5 or 6, at least)..., and I think it'll come out ok.

Appreciate all the assistance,

Larry

RE: Compound curves in decking

John,

You were right (not that I doubted you...), those dips magically disappeared as I nailed my way to the ends.  I guess the very slight (but present) curve of the sheer clamps forces that slight hump all the way to the end.

Lew,

I managed to use minimal curse words, thanks to maximum # of straps!  My wife's assistance came in handy, too... as did a couple nails for side-to-side alignment before applying glue.

Thanks again,

Larry

RE: Compound curves in decking

Larry...

Did your wife actually handle the boat, or did she just supply the curse words while you twisted the plywood?

RE: Compound curves in decking

Scratch,

Yeah, she actually "held the wood!"  I gave her some rubber gloves (as I'd just rolled fresh epoxy on the underside of the deck) and after we got started, noticed her nice red sweater was getting awfully close to that gooey epoxy sqeezing out the sides.  Fortunately, she escaped unscathed (unlike me, I was cutting dried epoxy out of my arm hair the next day - thinking I might lose some skin in the process!).

Oh, and the curse words were all mine (thoroughly practiced, I assure you!).

Larry

RE: Compound curves in decking

Larry,

Well done! You are now truly a boat-builder. And, your wife will later proudly tell folks admiring your beautiful boat[and they will], "I helped!"

Lew 

 

RE: Compound curves in decking

Lew, thanks.   I'll have to give credit where it's due.  In reality, she's given me LOTS of leeway (i.e., time) to hide in the garage working on this.  Can't complain at all.

I look forward to the folks admiring it!

Larry

RE: Compound curves in decking

Had similar problem on the compound curve of the fore deck. The initial hollow did "pop out" as I nailed the deck down, but I couldn't get the deck to rest on the forward bulkhead. Despite having an adult helper put their full weight on it, I'm still left with a 1/4 gap around the top of the bulkhead.

I know I'll be able to fill it with epoxy and maybe fiberglass tape, but was there a way to avoid this?

Thanks,

Eric

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