The dotted line

Greetings,

Plans for the PassageMaker should be on my doorstep when I get home sometime this week. I went plans rather than kit so I could throw boat bucks at the project as they appear, rather than saving for the whole enchilada. So I am thinking the first step is transferring the patterns to the plywood and cutting them out. A few questions:

  • What is the best tool? I have a cheap jigsaw, should this be upgraded?
  • Is the Japanese pull saw suggested for this to get the full zen like experience?
  • Is transfer paper the way to go for getting the patterns on the ply?
  • Do you cut the line, or just shy of it and follow up with s plane and/or sandpaper?

Thanks in advance. I have been lurking on this site for over a year now and am excited about finally putting metal to wood.

John

 

 


8 replies:

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RE: The dotted line

My wife bought me a Japanese pull saw (the CLC one) a few years back.  I find it considerably easier to use and store, and much more versatile than a push-type saw.  Also, it creates a smaller kerf.

(Can't help you on your religious question--I'm Presbyterian, and we just use a saws to cut stuff ;-)  

RE: The dotted line

I used a cheap jig saw with a good quality blade for my skin on frame  kayak.  Worked fine, though most of my edges are hidden inside the boat.  For the Coaming I resorted to the table saw for the clean - straight edge, again a good quality blade.  When I tackle my first S&G, I think might it as an excuse to upgrade my jig saw, the blade on mine tends to dance a little, can still get good results, just takes a little longer.

I did use a Japanese Pull Saw for the stringer ends and it was A-W-E-S-O-M-E!!!... I am a big powered tool guy but love the Japanese saw, actually using it for cuts I would have formerly plugged in a cord for.  They are not expensive (some are), here is the one I ended up with: http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p=32925&cat=1,42884,42924

Transfer paper: http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p=32818&cat=1,42936 - awesome stuff, I have traced frames for three kayaks and still using the same section, I think it will out last me ;)

As for cutting on the line,  I'm going to leave that to someone else to answer, I will be building my first CLC next summer, a C18 from plans.

At the end of the day it is less about the tool used and more about the tool holding it.  Work with what you are comforatable with, take you time, enjoy the journey and measure twice.

RE: The dotted line

  • What is the best tool? I have a cheap jigsaw, should this be upgraded?

Cheap jig saw is fine, quality blades are more important.

  • Is the Japanese pull saw suggested for this to get the full zen like experience?

Not necessary but can be helpful

  • Is transfer paper the way to go for getting the patterns on the ply?

Transfer paper is good, but more important is getting any patterns lined up correctly. Paper can stretch and bend quite easily.

  • Do you cut the line, or just shy of it and follow up with s plane and/or sandpaper?

Cut to 1/16th-1/32th of the line on straight cuts and exterior curves. Keep in mind that on interior curves the blade of the jigsaw will cut inside the line of your kerf on the bottom of the wood so give these curves more tolerance. Experiment on scrap. Follow up with a SHARP block plane and a SHARP spokeshave. If you don't know how to sharpen, learn before you start the boat. Also, the Shinto rasp is very handy for cleaning up small areas.

 -Dusty

RE: The dotted line

Oops, got the part about cutting the curves bassackwards. It is the exterior curves that will be undercut and should have more tolerances. (and when, o when, is CLC going to have a forum with an edit feature.)

RE: The dotted line

I am just past the satisfying stage of cutting out around the deck on my new Ches 17LT now that it has been epoxied to the hull.   The Japanese pull-saw (also used earlier to cut out the panels) is absolutely the way to go for intricate/ close-fitting work.   I’d never used one before – now much prefer it to a sabre saw (better control) and I do tend to find that my mind wanders when using the sabre saw, which then allows the blade to do the same!   I don't know about Zen, but I do find the pull-saw very satisfying to use, in the same way that anything that's well-designed and does a great job can impart pure joy sometimes.   The model I bought here in Oz is one-sided, brand is Tajima Rapid Pull 265 – it cost me about $22.   Spare blades are about $18.   It is one of three new tools I bought for the project that I simply wouldn’t be without for the next.   But of course the sabre saw is still needed for very tight curves. The best way to transfer printed plans from paper onto the ply to be cut, I have found, is to use a dress-maker’s marking-out pinwheel (I am not sure if that’s the correct name – but it describes its function).   It comprises a small metal wheel about ¾” diameter mounted vertically in a small steel housing that acts like an axle, all on a short wooden handle.   Around the circumference of the wheel are tiny teeth, so when the wheel is firmly pushed down and along a line on your plans, it will mark through with a line of little elongated ‘pricks’ about 1/16th inch long.   Just put your ply underneath and – voila!  Takes just a little getting used to, but boy, what a time-saver, and very accurate too.   I used it to cut out the stem and stern profiles and bulkheads – lofting is the answer to other panels unless you have full-size patterns.   Your local haberdashery store (if such things still exist) or a craft shop, should have them.   About $8 here. Cut fractionally outside the line, say 1/8th to ¼”, depending on how comfortable you are with your sawing accuracy.   Then as noted here, a VERY sharp small block plane will take you right up to the line, using longer and smoother rather than short, jabbing strokes.   The second of the indispensable tools I bought was a simple $35 or so Stanley plane- and chisel-blade sharpening device, which holds the blades at the correct angle for sharpening (kit included oilstone and even a tiny bottle of oil).   VERY frequent sharpening of the blade is recommended as the glues in marine ply tend to be very abrasive – and resharpening with this device is about a two-minute job. Good luck with the project – you will gain a lot of satisfaction from it I’m sure – I have! Wordsmith.

Oops

My apologies to the wizards at CCL. Most of these initial questions are neatly answered in the manual that was awaiting me at home. I do like the transfer paper idea though, and noticed that firm had a neat set of saw horse brackets as well. - John

RE: The dotted line

 

  • What is the best tool? I have a cheap jigsaw, should this be upgraded?

A small cordless circular saw cuts smother curvers than a jigsaw, if the radius isn't too small.

cordless circular saw

  • Is the Japanese pull saw suggested for this to get the full zen like experience?
I bought a cheap Japanese pull saw not expecting to use it much. But it's a wonderfull little tool that I've used quite a bit.
  • Is transfer paper the way to go for getting the patterns on the ply?
I just used the hull panel dimensions from the book and a flexiblestrip of wood to lay it out - turned out fine.  (didn't buy the plans)
  • Do you cut the line, or just shy of it and follow up with s plane and/or sandpaper
Leave the line, plane or sand up to it.

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