Duck 12 epoxy

Am I the only one to run out of epoxy?  I have 3 coats on and probably enough for the coaming.  I doubt enough for an end pour.

Kim


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RE: Duck 12 epoxy

No. I ran out on my shearwater. It happens. Beginners will use more epoxy than others, a learning curve is involved with everything we do, boats are no different.

Next time around, I know I will use much less.

RE: Duck 12 epoxy

I should have barely enough to finish, but I completely glassed the interior of my Duck 12, including both sides of the bulkhead (I bought extra 4 oz glass, there's not enough in the kit for that).

Woodflour is the other thing beginners run out of, usually because of fillets thick enough to cover the stitches.

Laszlo 

RE: Duck 12 epoxy

My 2nd yak.  I tried to go thin. 

RE: Duck 12 epoxy

"Woodflour is the other thing beginners run out of, usually because of fillets thick enough to cover the stitches."

 

Oooooops! Now you tell me! How do you get the tape to lie flat if the fillets aren't at least as high as the wires?

Mark

RE: Duck 12 epoxy

It took me 3 S&G boats to get to close to minimal epoxy use and even now I keep finding new tricks, though now I'm more worried about minimizing the amount of epoxy that stays in the boat vs. the amount that I use. Ideally, they should match, of course, but the world is never that perfect.

Mark,

You get rid of the wires. Once the boat is stitched the way you like it, you put epoxy/woodflour mix inbetween the wire stitches, let it cure completely,  then remove the wires. Now, instead of needing enough putty to bury the wires, all you need is enough to smooth the transition between panels to a 5/8" or more radius.

The pictures show how I did this on my Duck 12. Notice on the taped seam how the fillet fits completely between the stitch holes with plenty of room on either side, yet the tape sits completely flat with no bubbles. If the fillet was thicker it'd be excess weight and wasted epoxy.

Laszlo

 

Tacked Seams

 

RE: Duck 12 epoxy

I had to order more epoxy for my WD 12 also. It is my first boat.

RE: Duck 12 epoxy

Thank you for posting the pictures, Laszlo.

Mark 

RE: Duck 12 epoxy

I am just finishing the wood duck 12

This is my third boat, and I had to order more epoxy.  And I put it on thin as were the fillets.  I was going for a light boat.

 I also ran out of copper wire and glass tape.

 I think CLC needs to increase the materials for the duck

RE: Duck 12 epoxy

Mark, no problem.

In the meantime, as far as quantities go, I've completely glassed the inside of my Duck 12 (hull & deck), assembled the coaming and glued the deck to the hull. This is pretty much the equivalent of completing the boat according to the manual and I've still got at least 16 oz of epoxy and 8 oz of hardener left. I've got lots of tape, all my cabosil and half my woodflour left.

I did run out of wire because of all the times I had to restitch to close the ends, but presumably the new instructions in the new manual will take care of that problem.

Laszlo

 

RE: Duck 12 epoxy

I am gonna have to agree with cvisco.  I've run out of nails for my deck of my 18.  Which were overnighted to me.  On my Duck I ran out of copper wire too.  Got my own.  I was shorted on tape which was overnighted to me.  Now I have just enough epoxy to do my coaming.  I will probably get some cheap stuff for the end pours.

 Kim

RE: Duck 12 epoxy

I had a chance to actually measure (instead of just estimating) my remaining epoxy and it comes to 950 milliliters or almost exactly 1 quart (32 fl oz). There's half that amount of hardener left, as expected.

At this point the hull is joined to the deck, the hatch assembly is complete, the coaming and spacers are joined together (but not attached to the hull) and the inside of the hull, the underside of the deck and both sides of the bulkhead are completely glassed. This is the equivalent of having applied the exterior glass specified inthe manual, as far as epoxy usage goes. Instead of the endpour I used wooden stem & stern pieces bedded in epoxy putty.

So this is the equivalent of  having nearly completed the boat per the manual. To make it exactly equivalent, there's the allowance for gluing the coaming assembly to the deck, epoxying the hatch clips, epoxying the exterior and the glass lining the cockpit area. That should easily fit within the remaining quart.

I'm not trying to pick on anyone or to blow my own horn. This is just a datapoint in demonstrated epoxy consumption for building a Wood Duck 12. While individual results may vary, it's definitely possible to build one within the kit's epoxy budget.

Laszlo

 

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