Peeler Skiff

Like many people, I'm pretty anxious to get my hands on the Peeler Skiff kit.  I know I may be 'putting the cart before the horse' by asking this (since the kit is not available yet), but was wondering how easy or difficult it would be to have a remote steering/throttle console of some sorts just in front of the middle thwart?  I've built an Eastport Pram a couple years ago so I'm sure I could figure out how to fabricate a wooden console, but I have no experience with rigging a remote steering/throttle controls for an outboard motor.  Is this rigging doable / easy / hard?  If anyone has a link to instructions on how to do something like this, I'd appreciate it.

I did some web surfing and there's a Jericho Bay Lobster Skiff out there on the web that has this remote steering/throttle configuration.

Thanks,  Eric

 


18 replies:

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RE: Peeler Skiff

Adding a remote console would be a very doable project. You first need to see if your outboard is now or can be set up for remote steering. Some outboards can add a remote throtttle with factory parts and directions. An outboard set up for tiller steering control will either need a factory conversion for remote steering or an after market one if available. This can get to be quite expensive. Unfortunately for me, I had to buy a new 4cycle Yamaha 15hp engine which are no longer available with factory installed remote steering and the after market unit will cost well in excess of $1K for the conversion kit, Telex remote steering unit and cable and remote throttle control and cable plus installation labor. What ever you do, make sure you fully understand how much it will cost you for your remote steering kit all up.

I designed a quick sketch for a remote console unit which I've linked to. I sent it to John Harris at CLC and found that he has already been thinking along these lines and I can tell you his design idea is far better than mine. It wouldn't surprise me if John offers a remote option for the Peeler in the very near future when the kit is released. If not, you might look at the 15ft Longpoint Skiff for an idea on a simple console you could build. John's will be much better than mine below!

RE: Peeler Skiff

I'm going to build a PEELER SKIFF also. Originally I thought I wanted a console, sit-down steering etc but now I'm not sure. Electric start and all of the cables etc, might detract from the simple crabbing skiff design. I even looked at stick steering as a possible means of steering but with it you still need the cables for throttle and shifting unless you go to one of the remote plans. I'm planning on a tiller extension when needed and sitting near the helm with some passengers aboard,,, of course, all subject to change. Once I build the skiff, I'll know. I am aso getting the cart ahead of the horse. Half of the fun of this build is going to be the planning. Good luck, Ken.

RE: Peeler Skiff

Kiltz

I was thinking of side stick steering also - until I found I couldn't get a remote new 15hp Yamaha. If I had an older remote steering unit I would have construct a very small console box through the center thwart with the stick mounted centered to the seat. This would allow steering from either side of the thwart (most shady side?) and wouldn't take up so much room from crab traps. I'm now just going to follow your lead and get an extension for my tiller. I'm also planning on mounting my Battery under the center thwart (did you notice John Harris mounted a weight representing a battery under the center thwart for the Coast Guard test) which should get some of the weight out of the aft area. A spare three gallon gas tank might also be stored under it also - using a lighter 3gallon unit main tank near the motor. It also seems that with another person forward the extension tiller isn't necessary.

I'm about halfway done with one of the Beta Peeler builds. Since It's a Beta version I've built it without a manual so I don't want to be specefic about the building process except that It's the easiest boat I've ever put together and it just about builds itself. You are going to love John's incredible foresight for the Peeler design. There is a very good reason for every aspect of this boat and the more I work on her the more I see why changing the design isn't such a good idea. John is one smart guy and I've come away with a new respect for his design talent.

 

 

RE: Peeler Skiff

What does a Beta Build mean for this application, sorry for not knowing.

RE: Peeler Skiff

Klitz asked:

"What does a Beta Build mean for this application, sorry for not knowing."

I talked John Harris into selling me one of the first production practice runs of the Peeler. Since it is a Beta any problems with fit and assembly were my problem to correct (hardly any occured) and there was no building manual. I've had experience with stitch and glue boats (my first was a Cape Charles kayak long ago) so I wasn't intimidated by figuring out how to put everything together. If the boat design prototype turned out badly I would have been stuck with it (It turned out great). Any design changes needed on the prototype during on the water testing are also my responsibility to fix on my beta. John has help me with any problems I couldn't figure out myself and really supports beta builders.  John is constantly designing new ideas for kits so keep your ears open and perhaps you can talk him into letting you beta test a kit in the future.

RE: Peeler Skiff

Have you thought about how you are going to finish the skiff, colors etc. I think I will make my interior floor either natural or a darker color than white. White looks great but might show too much traffic wear as the outside bottom may. I did some checking on Skiff color combinations and there are many options. It will be easy to personalize the boat to the owners likes.

I will use water tight inspection hatches in the flotation tanks for storage access. Would you use foam flotation in the water tight compartments?

Are you posting photos of your build?  Thanks, Ken.

RE: Peeler Skiff

In the software world, beta testers don't have to pay. They receive the software free of charge before the general population has access to it. They get the chance to learn about it, incorporate it into their products & processes and to train up their employees in its use before their competition does. In return, the software company gets to find out how well the software works in the real-world environment, what changes need to be made to the product, manuals, training classes, etc. Beta testers basically provide a valuable service by providing large-scale real-world test resources that the software company can't afford. They also tend to get free or drastically reduced-price copies of the actual release software when it becomes ready.

So I was a bit surprised to see that CLC charges the beta builders. I guess the rules are different when the product involves a large pile of wood.

Laszlo

 

RE: Peeler Skiff

I'm interested in this for running a trot line. But I'd rather keep it simple and handle the motor with a tiller extension so, while crabbing, I'm standing near the stern and to one side to bring in the crabs. Problem with this is, when single handed, all the weight is in the back and wind plays hell with tracking the line. I think a small daggerboard somewhere mid-ship would be something I'd add.  Dave

RE: Peeler Skiff

Klitz

I'm going to be using System Three 2 part waterbased LPU paint on the Peeler. I'm using red on the bottom, white on the hull and a buff/tan on the seats and floor. I'm making floor grates from some Spanish cedar I have on hand and will use some purple heart for the rubrails. I've always used Brightsides and Easypoxy single part paints in the past so this will be new for me. I wanted to use a dark blue or green for the hull but the hot sun in Coastal Georgia caused me problems with telegraphing the fiberglass weave on other boats - so white it will be.

Laszlo

I did get a discount on my beta Peeler kit. I wouldn't think CLC could afford to just give away beta test kits and didn't expect them to. In actuality I have a hard time seeing how they are going to make much profit off the introductory Peeler kits considering that my kit contained 9 sheets of 9mm Joubert ply, one sheet of 18mm ply, and one sheet of 6mm all cnc cut with every stitch hole pre-drilled. It included 2 large #3 epoxy glue kits, 35 yards of 6oz glass cloth, two rolls of fiberglass tape, high quality millwork for breasthook, transom knees and wales etc. Production kits will also get a manual and any support necessary. 

 

 

RE: Peeler Skiff

Ludwigd

I think using the Peeler for running a trot line will work - but I would apply a workboat paint scheme and cover all the brightwork. I would also substitute hard oak, fir or purpleheart for the outside rubrail instead of the fancy one that comes with the kit. I am planning on carrying my battery and fuel tank under the center midship thwart to reduce weight aft. I believe you could add on a leaning post fairly easily to steer from while standing. I wonder if you could add on a CLC enclosed kayak rudder somewhere forward to help with the tracking? If it is too shallow, you can build one yourself fairly easily - possibly using the front seat front for part of the support. I would wait until I tested it to see if the rudder is necessary before cutting the bottom.

RE: Peeler Skiff

I'm just thinking about a simple drop in dagger board trunk mid-ship. You could make the dagger board any size you want. When done crabbing (or fishing for that matter), pull it out and off you go. I've done a lot of trotline crabbing with canoe and a 1963 15 ft traveler and have always been on the verge of adding some sort of lee board to help get some leverage on the boat when tracking a line in the wind. Looking forward to seeing some pics of your beta build! Dave

RE: Peeler Skiff

Robert:     What actually happens when the FG weave telegraphs, does the weave texture actually reflect to the surface and ruin a nice smooth finish? I'm new at this and want to avoid problems. Thanks for the information, Ken.

RE: Peeler Skiff

Kiltz (Ken)

I have no idea what causes print through on epoxy coated fiberglass after painting. Some people believe that the fiberglass and resin expand and contract at different rates. In my experience it usually happens after a hull painted a very dark color is exposed to heating in hot sunshine for long periods during the summer. In one case a kayak I built and painted a deep red with a one part poly was fine for awhile, but after continual summer heating began showing a faint fiberglass weave pattern. The paint still felt smooth but the weave looked faintly reflected on the surface. I read a test conducted somewhere on light vs. dark painted fiberglass surfaces in hot sunlight which showed very great differences in temperatures between the two. So, It was recommended that using light colors would reflect heat better thus supposedly helping avoid print through. Someone with experience might relate if it is a problem at higher latitudes. I have never finished large panels of a boat bright and don't know if print through is a problem with varnished epoxy. Hope someone might relate their experiences.

RE: Peeler Skiff

Thanks for your help, it all makes sense. I like your idea of cockpit grating, it would add a very nice touch. Are you going with 3/4 x 3/4 grates or a planking design. Good luck with your project.  Ken

RE: Peeler Skiff

Here is a picture taken last week of trial fitting the Peeler seat fronts. Since then I have splined, shaped and installed the breasthook, transom knees and the out wales.  I will fillet the seat fronts in next. Then epoxy, sand and prime the seat interiors and fill with closed cell blue insulation board. Then..and then..the list stretches on a long way. I think you all will like building a Peeler.

RE: Peeler Skiff

Robert: Are you making your floor grates removable? Would they need to be  made in half sections to remove? Would the split be front to stern? I did some reading about the Spanish Cedar, it looks like a nice wood to work with.

Some skiff designs use the floatation tanks for storage using a waterproof access hatch but that most likely wouldn't be Coast Guard approved not having foam in case of a big collision puncturing the tanks. One builder used pour in foam and found alot of condensation under it a year later.

Lots of things to think about. Thanks for the photo you submitted of your project.  Klitz

RE: Peeler Skiff

I'm using a waterproof acess hatch to provide access to a small portion of the under seat area. I will install a bulkhead separating the foam flotation board from the storage area. I am very aware that this will reduce some of the flotation capacity, however, the area behind the harch will not be much larger than the length of the hatch itself. I made up backer rings that will be glued to the back of the seat front to provide a thicker backing for the harch mounting screws to bite into. I am also installing a round removable port on the seat front toward the rear of the boat to inspect the foam board and air it out should it get wet for some reason. The small area behind the access hatch will keep a waterproof bag with cellphone, VHF radio, GPS, wallet, etc. It will remain locked during operation so should still add to flotation capacity.

I don't know how my grates will be constructed yet, but they will be removable. I believe they will be made in two sections for each area. I've been thinking I might be able to run my battery cable and extended fuel line from under the mid thwart back to the engine through a channel in the grate - or I might run two dedicated pvc pipes through the seats from the mid thwart to the rear to run lines in. As John Harris say's "Simpler is usually the best way" so the grate channel probably will prove to be the least complicated in the long run.

I wouldn't use expanding liquid foam for flotation - but have no experience with it. Sounds like you have your Peeler all planned out. The neat thing about this design is it is adaptable to so many great (and goofy) ideas. You can just about customize it anyway you want. My goofy idea is to add a cabin of some sort, a fold down one perhaps, and travel the Intercoastal Waterway. She's a good boat to make dreams with. 

 

 

 

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