Which sail rig?

Hello,

 

I am trying to decide on which sailboat to build among the Skerry, Passagemaker, and the Dory. When I look at the pictures of the various rigs I generally like the setup of the Dory but am concerned about what looks like potential interference between the tiller and the boom traveller. It looks like it would be awkward to get the tiller from one side to the other with those lines in the way. Could anyone let me know how this works in practice? Maybe I'm just confused by the pictures? Also, I may be sailing solo a good bit but would like to be able to have a couple of other people on board sometimes. With that in mind, are there advantages of one of these boats over the others or one type of sail rig over the others? Thanks for any help you can give me.

-k


14 replies:

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RE: Which sail rig?

I sail my Westriver 180 racing/touring hull kayak with a 32 sq.ft. sail and the kit sailrig.

 

I personally like the Skerry followed by Johns Sharpie but for sheer speed the proa.   I like the design of the skerry as a sailboat, nice fish form with no bulky transom - looks more elegant to me.  Again, no swipe at the others - I just think thats the superior choice all your needs considered. The dory looks a little large.

 

Youll see I have a 32 sq;.ft sail, this isnt to say Johns arent superb but at the time I was turning my sailrig into a single outrigger sailor and I wanted the option of reefing to 25 sq. ft.  At anyrate the lone outrigger is a bad idea.  Fun but to flip prone on a boat that requires hiking out to stabilize regardless of sail area.  I may infact option up and go for their big sailrig sail.  Just mentioning it.  Glad I did try the proa though jus to answer the many questions I had.

]

Skerry!!!

 

Pete

RE: Which sail rig?

K,

I am in this spot to. Actrually purchased Passagemaker plans and returned them for the Skerry, but now think that may have been a mistake and also drool over the Dory. A good thing to do is sail all three at Okoumefest. I did that and it was a blast.

Here are my "pros" for each boat:

  • Dory: More gear, very easy build (I hear), salty look, each person in my 4 person family gets their own bench!
  • Passagemaker: True SUV capabilities with row, sail or motor options. Take apart option makes it easier to store / transport. Sail plan and rudder set up is familiar
  • Skerry: High boom. Very salty look with sprit sail.
My pros for all boats: light weight, car topable, stunning looks.
 
When I Google them I get great pictures and video for each. I think this is odd but I see more people making passages with the Skerry and Dory than the Passagemaker. Out cruising the LI Sound or Lake Ontario etc. The closest I see with the actual Passagemaker is John Harris on the Chesapeake - but that guy can probably circumnavigate in an Eastport Pram.
 
Would love to hear from some camp sailers using any of these.
 
JH

RE: Which sail rig?

I thought that the Dory had a push-pull rudder, in which case there's no swinging from one side to the other.

Laszlo

RE: Which sail rig?

Laszlo is correct about the Dory setup. The same is used on the Skerry. Takes a few minutes to get used to but has definite advantages over a normal tiller setup.

As far as sailing, the Dory sails well singlehanded but if the wind is up and there's some chop it sails better with more of a load. Another person or a bag of rocks works well. The Skerry is just plain fun to sail. The Dory is faster. Both rigs are quick to set up, I have the sloop rigged Dory, takes 5-10 minutes to get in the water.

George K

RE: Which sail rig?

George, I am nearing completion of the dory and deciding on a sail rig. Is the idea accurate that with the sloop rig you are either going out to sail or to row?  I want to be able to shift between rowing and sailing on the same outing, i.e. row out and sail back. Barry

RE: Which sail rig?

Barry,

Pretty much that's the situation with the sloop rigged dory. Those who know me know I hate to row (why do people enjoy going backwards?) so it's never been a problem as I only sail mine! It would be possible, I suppose, to tie the boom up against the mast and row. It's not possible to row with the boom down.

George K

RE: Which sail rig?

Follow up answer, CLC has a standing lug rig for the Dory now, I believe. You might be able to row with it in place. Hopefully someone in the know from CLC will chime in on that one. 

 

George K

RE: Which sail rig?

Thanks for all the responses! I just signed up for the boatbuilding class for the dory in September. I couldn't decide between the dory and skerry but the class decided for me. So as Lazlo was saying you stay sitting on one side because the push/pull tiller lets you control it that way? Is that correct? But if you are heeled over that could be tough. I guess I'll see how that works when I get it. Thanks again. K

RE: Which sail rig?

No, you're not limited to where you sit in the boat at all. The tiller extension is around 6' long, you customize it to your liking, and that enables you to sit just about anywhere in the boat you want. 

Yeaterday John Harris posted an excellent blog on lug rigs. Those interested in something other than the sloop rigged Dory should check it out. 

George K

RE: Which sail rig?

Every once in a while I hear if someone not liking a push pull tiller extension. The story told is that simething happened where they needed to turn whichever way and they did the opposite and all hell broke loose. It doesnt have to be that way. I taught myself that right turns i push and left i pull. Period. The way i ingrained it and this is key, is that mentally as im walking around during the week id ever so subtely make the push or pull depending which way i was turning to.  Right turn? I subtely oush forward, hand in pocket. 

 

Bingo its programmed. If the only time its even thought about is in the boat - yiu may run into errors. And its so simple to program ones self.

 

Dont EVER not get tgat extension because of error failure. Practice it while u walk. When you sail, its second nature.

 

Pete

RE: Which sail rig?

Yes - adapting between the traditional set up of the Passagemaker and the push/pull of the Skerry and Dory was no big deal when I was test sailing at Okoumefest - even though I had never used the push/pull before. In my opinion, it actually provides more options of where to sit.

The only thing I had to adjust to is when single handing I sometimes take my hand off the tilller. Not good practice to begin with. With the Passagemaker the tiller was always still in the boat. With the Dory and Skerry I did lose it overboard. Easily retrievable and again, avoidable if you did not use this poor practice. Almost like the boats teach you to be a better sailor.

jh

RE: Which sail rig?

I can't speak for the other boats, but I've logged over 1,000 miles on my dory since she was launched in July 2010.

I chose the Balance Lug rig as it's possible to row with the rig up and to unstep the mast underway. It is not as efficient upwind, but I like the simplicity of 1 sheet, 1 halyard, etc.

The dory is rated for an 800# payload and is very seaworthy. Below is my favorite shot somebody took while on the last leg of the WaterTribe's 2012 Everglades Challenge, which is in the record books as the worst weather in the 12 year history of the race. 300 miles from Tampa Bay to Key Largo, unsupported. This is a rare moment when I did not have the sail double reefed.

Northeaster Dory EC2012

 

RE: Which sail rig?

Sorry the pic is not centered, but you get the idea.

Also, the push-pull tiller & yoke arrangement is easily learned after a week or two of sailing the baot. I actually prefer it now.

 

Good luck!

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