. . . and yet another duckling launched

Photos of the Wood Duck 12 "Ugly Duckling" (cf. eponymous Hans Christian Andersen story) re-launched out of the second story window of the apartment where she was built, following installation of graphite/Dynel rub strips fore and aft and interior bungy cord.  Still haven't found the right weatherstripping to keep the rear hatch from standing proud of the deck. At: http://jockyellott.googlepages.com/home  

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RE: . . . and yet another duckling launched

It looks good! Now where will you store her, I hope it doesn't have to back in the window each time. And tell your bos'n that he doesn't need to dress up for the photos. Did you try the kite out?

Ralph 

. . . and yet another duckling launched

She'll summer on the cartop, ready to be tossed off bridge abutments into inviting unexplored rivers, or hauled through the trees to mysterious lakes with hidden coves. She'll winter in Dad's garage. Would that I too was rich and indolent enough to be one of those able to use seasons as a verb.   No--I've not yet tried the kite.  The most intelligent account I've seen so far of kayak-kiting is at http://www.amoka.com/kayak.html.  Note the badly sketched but nonetheless informative diagram about midway down that webpage.  It shows how to properly tether the kite to the bow padeye, and the requisite sea anchor to the aft padeye, to provide enough drag to keep the kite aloft and the kayak pointed the right direction.  If you simply fly a large kite from the cockpit I think the Wood Duck would broach.  I would add to that diagram two more strings: one to the tail of the kite and one to the tail of the sea anchor, so that if necessary both can be "scandalized" as sailors say--yanked out of the flow of wind and water to reduce or curtail their draw.  The kite if the wind gets too strong or if a collision is imminent; the sea anchor if the wind fails and the drag overwhelms the kite.  The objective is not having to leave the cockpit to tend to them.  

RE: . . . and yet another duckling launched

Actually that looks more of an 'elegant duckling' to me. Love the classic color scheme and is it just a trick of the light or is your 'brightwork' more of a satin finish rather than blinding high gloss? whatever, it looks great in those pics, I want one just like that.... I bet you're one proud father duck.

On the topic of kites, I keep an eye on a blog from a fellow kiwi (New Zealander), this one will make your eyes water...

http://outriggersailingcanoes.blogspot.com/

while you're there you might check out Garys canoe designs via the link at top left of page or here:

http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/garyd/ 

I am in the process of putting together a canoe resembling one of his outrigger designs, but a Wood Duck is a close second on my wish list...

Happy flying in that duck, Dave

 

 

 

RE: . . . and yet another duckling launched

Doh! forgot to say you will need to scroll down a bit in Garys blog, look for Need For Speed... its worth the detour

 Dave 

RE: . . . and yet another duckling launched

Rafaelo,

Very nice. That's a good paint scheme for kiting, since the white bottom shows up better than a black one when you're upside down :-) It also seems from the photos that you carried the paint scheme through on the inside of the cockpit. I've never seen that before. Nice touch.

That boat's an inspriation, not just because it's such a nice one, but because it demonstrates that one does not need Norm's workshop to build a high quality boat. Well done,

Laszlo

 

RE: . . . and yet another duckling launched

Aw shucks (blushes).   Yes it is a satin finish, over about four coats of glossy for UV protection. Two reasons: I like a satin finish so wood looks like wood and not glass or plastic,  and also, the epoxy drips don't stand out like neon signs advertising "first time builder."  Thank to davep for the links,and to Lazlo for a compliment which I really take to heart.  The interior paint job required a slight variance from the manual--finishing the interior before joining hull and deck-- since nobody is going to get arms and elbows and hands all the way up into the bow and stern once those are joined.

 

LAszlo has a good point about kiting--I am going to practice some re-entry from capsized Wood Duck drills.      

RE: . . . and yet another duckling launched

Looks sweet!  I am itching to build another boat.  The problem is I have too many boats already.  I am trying to get the wife interested so I can build her a 12' wood duck.  It seems like a good stable boat for beginners.  How does it track?

RE: . . . and yet another duckling launched

Rafaelo,

Wet re-entries in a WD12 are easy, it's a very stable boat. I did one while test driving the WD12 prototype at last July's Annapolis Demo night. It may have been the first WD12 wet re-entry ever, due to the cold New England water temps discouraging Eric & the top right corner gang from leaving the boat. CLC's Maggie decided to immortalize the event.

Note that this was before the prototype had the rigging (or rudder or eyeball sail) attached. The only thing I had to hold onto was the coaming. Even so, it worked the first time.

Brainchild,

With little or no wind it tracks very well. As the wind picks up it starts to weathercock. In 30+ mph wind it takes constant corrections unless you're going upwind.

You can get around the weathercocking by putting weight in the rear compartment. This moves the center of gravity backwards, reducing the weathercocking. More weight will also bring the boat down by the stern, giving a skeg effect and further reducing the weathercocking. Too much weight in the back, though, will cause the transom to drag and slow down the boat, so just add enough to reduce the corrective paddling to a comfortable level.

But in the normal wind range that most beginners find comfortable, the tracking is fine as is. And by the time they're no longer beginners, the corrective strokes aren't a problem.

Laszlo 

 

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