stitch and glue

I have dicided to do a stich and glue to put my yatch tender together in shop and was wondering what to use for the stiches.

 I have heard a few things copper wire stianles steel wire and heavy fishing line

I'm not realy sure on the last one but was wondering if it would work


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RE: stitch and glue

Hello.  Copper wire is the material to use.  If you get epoxy on it, it will heat easily to allow the wire's removal.  In most casaes. you can use one hand to twist he copper where as using fish line, you would need two hands to tie the knot AND once tied, ytou could NOT adjust the tension.  Stainless wire is to durible.  If you over twist the copper, it breaks without damaging the wood panels.  Using stainless, you could EASILY cut thru the wood.    My two cents worth... ~BRUCE~  Wood Duck 12 "DAFFY DUCK"

RE: stitch and glue

i was wondering how far do i put the stitches away from each other

 

RE: stitch and glue

i was wondering how far do i put the stitches away from each other

 

RE: stitch and glue

I've used copper wire and found it great. I actually stripped the wire out from a length of 3 core house wire I had lying around. Many people use cable ties and seem happy, see this shop tip:

http://www.clcboats.com/shoptips/stitch_glue/stitching_options.html

I spaced stitches about 6" apart, it becomes obvious you need extras here and there, notably to hold bulkheads in place and where strains are greater. I got the idea of tack and remove from this forum: tack weld between stitches with tiny drops or short runs of epoxy glue. Then remove all stitches and run your continuous epoxy glue lines down the seams, covering the tack spots as you go. Many of the stitch holes are covered by the epoxy fillet and a quick swipe with glue on a palette knife fills the rest. Tying knots in nylon sounds fiddly compared to copper or cable ties. Copper also allows you to tighten or loosen stitches as needd.

 

  cheers Dave

 

RE: stitch and glue

I've used both SS and Copper, and the only difference I find is the Copper seems to break about 20% of the time when doing the final tightening, whereas the SS only broke a few times and seemed stronger, even with the same guag thickness.

 As for spacing it depends on the design & the part it is pulling together - for the Wood-duck 12 i'm building most of the stiches are about 6" apart but where the bow is pulling in on a fairly tight curve they are as close as 3".  I would do whatever you need to keep the curves flowing smoothly yet still having the pieces pulling together.  Also, I found in the spots where the curves were  fairly tight I needed more because when I only had 1 stictch it broke as there was too much stress on it, so it needed more to spread the stress out.

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