Antique

OK, so my wife gave me a kayak kit for my birthday about...fifteen years ago, maybe longer. The sad part is, its still in the garage in it's original packaging. I just can't seem to get the nerve up to pull it out and get started. In the mean time I've had ewo children and designed, drew the plans and built our house from the ground up. I think that I am sooo type A that I want it to be perfect and I just don't have the nerve. Can some one kick me in the a...........?

25 replies:

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RE: Antique

Possibly someone in your area can provide the needed push to get-it-going. Let folks know where you live and I think someone will step forward to provide inspiration and example which will coax you into the water. Nerves- that's the fun of it

Lew

RE: Antique

splash,

After having the CH17 kit sit in my shop for 8 years, start a cabinetry business, and push two kids into and through high school, I decided that I had looked at an incomplete kayak too long.

I totally get the Type-A issue.  You just need to read, research, ask lots of questions, and DO NOT be in a hurry.  If you want to rush through it, don't bother starting yet.  With the right patience, your type-A reward system will be FULLY satisfied.

Just my two cents worth

Donald
Ontario, Canada 

 

RE: Antique

Yeah, you have a problem.  What you need to do is buy another kit that will become the 'perfect boat.'  Build the old kit as practice for the second.  Then give the second one, when finished, to your wife to thank her for the wonderful gift she gave to you.  By the way, building a kayak is a lot more fun than building a house.  Enjoy.

RE: Antique

People build for different reasons. I would suggest that you start your project but do not set a time limit or schedule. My Mill Creek took about 1 1/2 years and it was a very relaxing build with no set schedule. My priorities were craftsmanship not speed and to build with hand tools. I remember talking myself out of slapping on a coat of varnish so I could take it to OkoumeFest last year. This year it will be going… http://dehager.smugmug.com/Boats/CLC-Mill-Creek-165/6686487_BbGBe

 

RE: Antique

As another Type A who has built a couple of houses and now on my third kayak (fifth boat), let me suggest you just do it. It will be less than perfect but will work just fine and you will thoroughly enjoy the experience. And I agree with ootdb that building a kayak is a lot more fun and a lot easier than building a house! You can relive my experiences by looking at my kayak construction pages: www.twofootartist.com
-Wes

RE: Antique

There is probably money to be made for any shrink that wishes to hang out a shingle at Okoumefest.

With that said I think I am a type B, intimidated by all of you Type A's. One reason my Skerry is on hold is I am not convinced I have the patience and attention to detail provided. Not sure if I wish to sail in a craft built to "good enough for government work" standard. How much of a mistake can epoxy slurry really cover?

I also find myself having committment issues. I bought plans for Passagemaker. Traded for Skerry and thought I was set but then CLC came out with the NE Dory. And there is the school of thought that I should build the boat I really want- Pocket Ship.

Then my Fatherhood gene kicks in and I think about building the boat that they really want - can't wakeboard off of Pocket Ship.

RE: Antique

JS,

Considering that early kayaks were built, basically, from scraps and could endure horrendous conditions, the CLC offerings, even if built to a "government standard," are quite sturdy.  If you are really worried about what you are capable of building, build a Cradle Boat as furniture or an Easrport pram as a tender for a future Pocket Ship.  Or help someone else build to get your feet wet.  Or take a class.  The Forum members will help and CLC will most certainly offer help and guidance.  If you lived near me (S MD) I would come over and help.  And my adult children would trade wakeboarding time for Pocket Ship time.  Enjoy Okoumefest.

RE: Antique

You got some great advice.  I bought the New Kayak Shop book back in August '09.  Read it and researched all the supplies for months.  Finally had the nerve to start it in October.  Just finshed the other week. I paced myself and did not force myself to work on it everyday or every week.  Sometimes it is good to take a break and clear your mind.  Could not have done it without this forum and all the input.  I promise, once you start it, you will get hooked and will be done before you know it.  Good luck!

RE: Antique

Hi krsplash,

To do a really good job on your kayak, you're going to have to learn how to work skillfully with the materials.  Unless you are unusually talented to begin with, that includes gaining experience by making "mistakes".  Like many of us, you can make them on the kayak, and do your best to correct them.  But, depending on your attitude, the finished product may or may not make you happy.  It's completely individual.

Another approach is to take the pressure off and build your skills first on a simple, quick project that isn't nearly as "precious".  Make it as inexpensive as possible.  In fact, make it intentionally somewhat crude.  You might find it very liberating to have something you can use hard, and easily repair as it needs it.  But if you don't want the thing around when it's finished, you can probably find someone who'd be very happy to have it.

How about a useful cheapie like this, as a training exercise?

http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans/jim/toto/index.htm


It's great to develop refined skills, of course.  But lots of us drive ourselves a little crazy by chasing perfect objects.  I'm not sure that's very healthy.

Cheers,
Grant

RE: Antique

An even simpler design that should paddle well is Nick Schade's Ganymede. I'm helping my daughter build one and I keep telling her there is nothing she can do wrong that can't be fixed. -Wes

RE: Ganymede

Hi twofootartist,

The Ganymede looks interesting.  What are you using for plywood?  Do the hull and deck seams all get fillets and glass tape?

RE: Antique

In response to Old Yeller, we used 4mm Okuome for the hull (two sheets) and 3mm Sapele for the deck (one sheet). I don't think I would use Sapele again as it is much harder to cut and plane than Okuome. The hull and deck seams are filleted, but the hull to deck seam is not, according to the instructions. I did fillet that seam in the area of the cockpit, however. You can see photos and lots more comment on my website at http://twofootartist.com/ganymede-construction-notes/
-Wes

RE: Antique

That Toto is not really any simpler than most CLC boats, it just looks as if it should be. That clunky bulky shape hides the fact that it has more pieces of wood to cut and assemble than the Wood Ducks or Chessies.

The Toto's attraction, I guess, is that it starts out so ugly that builders don't have to worry about making it look worse. Of course, they can't make it look any better. Whereas Eric Schade's designs start out very attractive and can be made spectacular.

Laszlo

 

RE: Antique

For Dehager, that's a cool roller on the back of your car, where'd you get it?

For Krsplash, Just build it already, first time you drag it over a coral beach or an oyster bed that type A deal will go right out the window. SEEYA Jack

RE: Antique

I built that roller for about $20, see my notes in

http://www.clcboats.com/forum/clcforum/thread/10240.html

It sparked some interest so I'll post some how to info on it. Actually cool as I can load the Mill Creek myself.

RE: Antique

Lazlo, dude!  Why you harshin' on my project?  :-)

 "The Toto's attraction, I guess, is that it starts out so ugly that builders don't have to worry about making it look worse. Of course, they can't make it look any better."

 

RE: Antique

Sorry. I let my Evil Twin get the better of me. :-) I should have come up with a more genteel way of saying it. How's this:

"With its simple but functional lines, Toto is a boat that does not intimidate builders into attempting a yacht showroom finish. It lets them concentrate on getting out onto the water"

Better?

Laszlo

 

RE: Antique

Hee hee!  I was jus messin' with ya, Laszlo.  I'm not building a Toto.   But your revised description is a definite improvement.  There aren't too many of Jim Michalak's designs that are visually appealing enough for me to consider building them - and he'd be the first to admit that.  But I think his unfussy approach and suggested use of readily available lumberyard materials represents an often liberating alternative.

Not all owner-built boats need to be family heirlooms.  Very functional boats for sheltered inshore waters can be quickly built from cheap materials, quickly repaired with cheap materials, and by the time the cheap materials begin to deteriorate, the builder is probably ready to try a different sort of boat, anyway.

We might also add that a simple dirt cheap first project also lets a guy get started in boatbuilding (and boating), instead of stashing a fancy kit in the corner of his basement for 15 years because he's afraid he's gonna ruin it.  I mean no disrespect at all to "krsplash" by that comment, because I've also had firsthand experience with those demons.

Grant

RE: Antique

Hey Dude,

I live over here in Hernando, FL. A stones throw from the Rainbow River.  If you want some help, or just need to talk about details just give a shout. 

RE: Antique

Wow! I never expected my problem to have this kind of responce. I want to say thanks to those who took the time to give some incouragement. I have enjoyed just watching how you all interact with each other. This is my first time with this blog and I know when I actually blow the dust off my kit and get started, I will have the help I need . Thanks again and I'm in the Jacksonville Florida area for anyone that wants to help....haha

RE: Antique

Hey "krsplash",

"Antique" might not be a bad name for your vessel.  Not that I'm sayin' it's gonna take you that long ...

RE: Antique

krsplash,

I recently completed an oxford shell that a friend gave me after keeping it in storage for 10+ years. It took two months to complete the project with help from this site. Jackln offered advice by phone. These builders forum people are great. I enjoyed this first time project so much that I have ordered a Wood Duck Kit. I can assure you that "YOU CAN DOO IT". You may want to get fresh epoxy because 15 year old stuff may not be reliable.

RE: Antique

The resin is said to have an "infinite" shelf life, so that shouldn't be an issue.  The hardener has probably turned brown, but should still work.  The MAS rep told me to mix up a small test batch, and if it cures to final hardness you can go ahead and use it.  If it has been stored in cold temperatures some crystals may have formed.  Those can be redissolved by a one-time gentle warming. 

When you mix the clear resin with the brown hardener (2:1 for MAS), it dilutes the brown color quite a bit so it isn't terribly noticable.  But if you want a truly clear coating you might want to pick up some fresh hardener.  Since I painted the sides and bottom I just got a small amount for fiberglassing the deck.

RE: Antique

As a person who first built an epoxy stitch and glue boat fifteen years ago, I can tell you that the quality of epoxy we buy today is far better than it was back then. It is less likely to blush or form eyes, and lasts longer in storage. The epoxy I saved in 1995 only lasted about a year before turning nearly opaque. -Wes

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